Posts tagged ‘stefano accordini’

2009 Amarone – a Preview

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Tiziano Accordini, Stefano Accordini winery (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

A few weeks ago, I made a quick trip to Verona to attend the annual Amarone Anteprima event. These  anteprima tastings, which are held in various wine zones in Italy, are preview tastings for journalists, who are presented with the opportunity to taste new releases several months before the wines are released.

Of course, Amarone is a wine that takes years to display its complexities, so it’s important to remember that when tasting wines that are not yet available in the market. This year, it’s especially important, as the wines we tasted were from the 2009 vintage, a warm, sometimes hot growing season that produced big, forward wines that are not typical for this area.

That’s not to say they’re not good, as I tasted several excellent wines. But keep in mind that 2009 followed 2008, which was a stellar vintage. The 2008s have not only excellent concentration, but also very good acidity and marvelous structure – some of the top examples of 2008 Amarone will be at their peak in 20-25 years, something that I doubt will be the situation with the 2009s.

Also when passing on my judgment of the best wines I tasted during this event, I have to note that some of the finest artisan estates were not participating for various reasons. I do think that given the vary nature of Amarone as a wine that requires patience on the part of the drinker, there are some producers who simply believe that showing their new Amarone in January won’t be of any use, as they would prefer to wait at least six months or longer to taste out their wines with critics and consumers.

That said, 2009 could shape up to be a very nice vintage, though it will probably be one that will be overlooked, especially given the classic style of the 2008s as well as the powerful 2006s, many of which are still on the market.

Here are the best examples of 2009 Amarone I tasted at the anteprima tasting in January:

Stefano Accordini “Acinatico” (always a fine wine with good typicity)

Zecchini (particularly excellent with admirable restraint)

Cantina di Soave “Rocca Sveva” (another fine Amarone from this producer – ripe and tasty)

Corte Sant’Alda (nice structure and impressive complexity)

Cavalchina (lovely freshness; strawberry and cherry fruit)

Monte del Fra (nicely balanced with good typicity)

I Scriani (very impressive balance and persistence)

Novaia ( elegant and delicious with beautiful complexity – a lovely wine!)

Look for these bottlings of 2009 Amarone to appear in the marketplace in the fall of this year.

February 10, 2013 at 10:52 am Leave a comment

Amarone 2008 – A First Look

(Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I recently joined a group of journalists from around the world who were invited by the Consorzio Valpolicella to take part in the annual Anteprima Amarone event in Verona. This tasting is an opportunity for writers specializing in Italian wines to taste the soon-to-be-released examples of Amarone from several dozen producers; this year the featured vintage was 2008.

As in many wine districts throughout Italy, temperatures have been increasing slightly over the past several years; in the Valpolicella district, just north of Verona, this was certainly the case in 2006 and even more so in 2007. Thus a cool – read more typical – growing season with moderate temperatures that characterized 2008 in this area was a welcome change to most producers. This has resulted in wines that have very good acidity, impressive concentration and beautifully defined perfumes. Stefano Cottini, proprietor of Scriani in Fumane in the Classico zone of Valpolicella, says that 2008 was “a very easy year. Nature gave us a beautiful growing season. All we had to do was wait for the grapes to come in.” Cottini believes that his 2008 Amarone will age longer than many recent vintages thanks to the ideal structure of the wine.

Tasting through more than 40 different examples of 2008 Amarone, I had mixed feelings about the wines. Indeed these wines do have very good acidity and with some of the wines, excellent structure. This is not a vintage for short-term enjoyment such as 2007, but one that demands time in the bottle; I’m guessing that many of the finest Amarone from 2008 will peak in another 12-15 years. This estimate on my part (some wines tasted here were barrel samples) means that 2008 is a middle-weight vintage, not as rich as 2006 or 2001, but one that offers better aging potential than 2007 or 2005.

A few highlights of this tasting. First and foremost are the wines of Antolini, a small estate in Marano, operated by brothers Pier Paolo and Stefano. I first tasted these wines four years ago at the Anterprima event and placed their 2004 Moropio bottling as my top wine; this was also the case this year with their 2008 version – talk about consistency! The 2008 Ca’ Coato Amarone is a beautifully made wine with lovely aromas of red cherry, strawberry and red roses with excellent persistence and very good acidity, while the 2008 Moropio takes things up a notch. This offers similar aromas – there are strong notes of strawberry preserves- along with perfect harmony of all components as well as outstanding complexity. This is already an impressive wine and should turn out to be a great wine!

The Stefano Accordini “Acinatico” displayed its usual excellence; black cherry, myrtle and sage aromas are backed by excellent depth of fruit and persistence. The 2008 Bertani “Villa Arvedi” has lovely fruit and tobacco aromas with very good concentration and impressive persistence with an elegant entry on the palate. Note that this is not the traditional Bertani Amarone – that 2008 version will not be released for another three years.

The Ca’ La Bionda Ravazzol is a first-rate wine with notes of cherry preserves and a hint of chocolate; there is excellent depth of fruit and persistence with very subtle oak and elegantly styled tannins. This traditional producer is one of the most underrated in this zone and after meeting proprietor Alessandro Castellani, it is easy to understand why as he prefers to talk about his land and his wine rather than awards or points. What a refreshing attitude!

Two other excellent wines that are definitely worth seeking out are the 2008 Corte Sant’Alda and the 2008 Massimago. Both wines are from the eastern reaches of the Valpolicella zone near the town of Mezzane, outside of the Classico district and interestingly, both estates are managed by women. Marinella Camerani is the boss at Corte Sant’Alda and has been crafting lovely Amarone for 25 years now; her 2008 has inviting aromas of morel cherry, violets and red plum and has a generous mid-palate, excellent persistence and beautiful structure. Look for this wine to be at its best in another 12-15 years although it will probably drink well for another few years after that. Camerani did not produce a 2007 Amarone, so her selection process is strict and it shows in this wine.

Camilla Rossi Chauvenet, Massimago (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

At Masimago, 27-year old Camilla Rossi Chauvenet has made quite a name for herself in this area, even though she only started producing wines from the 2004 vintage. I was impressed by the roundness and varietal character of her 2007 Amarone, but her 2008 is a better wine, with better integrated oak as well as a longer finish and greater overall complexity. I told Camilla that I thought her 2008 was an improvement on her 2007 and she agreed with me, stating that this is undoubtedly a better Amarone. Keep an eye out for this producer, as her wines will be available in the US very soon.

Finally, high marks as well for the 2008 Amarones from Scriani, a medium-full wine with lovely balance along with the bottlings from Valentina Cubi and Santa Sofia; the former a ripe, forward style of Amarone with elegant tannins while the latter is a more subdued version that is one of the best I’ve tried from this long-standing estate in several years.

One final note on this tasting. There were almost two dozen of the best producers that are members of the Valpolicella Consorzio that did not participate in this event. While each winery had their reasons for not showing their wines (the wines not being “ready” was the most common I heard), it is a shame that this tasting did not represent the majority of the finest producers of Amarone. While I did taste some impressive wines at this event, I hoped for more. Let’s hope this situation can be rectified for next year’s anteprima.

February 6, 2012 at 9:37 am 1 comment

Best Italian Reds of the Year

Aging caves at the cellar of Elio Grasso (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Without further ado, here is a partial list of my choices of the best Italian red wines of the year. A full list (along with the best whites of the year and a list of the best producers) can be found in the next issue of my Guide to Italian Wines. For subscription information, click here.

 

2007 PRODUTTORI DEL BARBARESCO BARBARESCO

There are so many wonderful bottlings of Barbaresco from the excellent 2007 vintage; given space limitations, I’ll only mention one. This is the normale Barbaresco from this great producer, a blend of several different vineyards within the town of Barbaresco. The 2007 vintage for Barbaresco was all about finesse and not power; this wine has gorgeous aromatics and beautiful acidity along with the subtle oak and ideal balance this producer is so well known for. This should drink well for 10-12 years. Also among the finest wines of the year were the 2005 cru bottlings of this producer from the Rio Sordo, Pajé and Montestefano vineyards.

 

2006 ELIO GRASSO BAROLO “GAVARINI CHINERA”/BAROLO “GINESTRA CASA MATE´”

So many outstanding bottlings of Barolo from 2006 – again with space limitations, I have room for only a few. Here are two wonderful wines from this ultra consistent Barolo producer in Monforte d’Alba. Both of these wines offer impressive concentration and a distinct spiciness that emerges from the local terroir. These are both aged in large casks, so oak plays a supporting role and does not dominate. 2006 was an old-fashioned, classically structured vintage for Barolo, so these wines should peak in 25 years plus. Purchasing an Elio Grasso Barolo is always a wise choice, especially from the 2006 vintage.

 

2004 IL POGGIONE BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO RISERVA

Hardly a surprise here, given the long-term excellence of this producer combined with the excellent 2004 vintage. This wine is from the I Paganelli vineyard, planted in 1964 and displays the concentration and complexity of these older vines. Medium-full, this has layers of fruit and a lengthy finish with subdued wood notes (grandi botti aging), lively acidity and polished tannins and offers exceptional harmony. This should drink well for 20-25 years.

 

2004 STEFANO ACCORDINI AMARONE “IL FORNETTO”

This excellent producer releases this special bottling only in the finest vintages; this 2004 certainly lives up to that entitlement. Medium-full with an explosion of fruit, this offers flavors of red raspberry and fig with light raisiny notes and has a rich finish with youthful, but refined tannins and lovely balancing acidity. Look for this wine to drink well for 12-15 years. It may be difficult to find this wine, but if you are lover of Amarone, you need to taste this!

 

2002 FEUDI DI SAN GREGORIO TAURASI RISERVA “PIANO DI MONTEVERGINE”

Taurasi is Campania’s contribution to the list of Italy’s most accomplished red wines and Feudi is one of leading producers of this wine type. This is from a site very close to the town of Taurasi; planted more than 25 years ago, this is an outstanding Aglianico vineyard. Medium-full, this is a beautifully structured wine with excellent persistence and silky tannins to accompany the delicious black cherry and candied plum fruit. As I wrote in my review in my Guide to Italian Wines earlier this year, “2002 was not a year that led itself to greatness in this area, but this is an accomplished bottling.” As this bottling is a bit lighter than a typical vintage (though still quite rich), expect this to peak in 12-15 years.


December 29, 2010 at 12:30 pm Leave a comment

Odds and Ends – My Favorites from VinItaly

A stunning Franciacorta, some gorgeous 2009 whites and that Vermentino Nero:

Robert Princic, Proprietor, Gradis’ciutta, Friuli (Photo ©Tom Hyland)


Back from another VinItaly and bursting with dozens of beautiful wines I’d like to talk about – and I didn’t even get to taste any wines from Abruzzo, Alto Adige or Sicily. Here are thoughts on a few:

Beautiful 2009 whites

VinItaly has the advantage of being the first major fair of the year where producers sample their newest wines for the press and the public; in the case of the white wines that meant the 2009s for most bottlings. However, this also meant wines that had only been bottled for a week or two, so it’s a bit difficult to reach a final decision on these wines, as they’re not quite all together yet. However, the 2009 whites as a whole showed beautifully, especially from Avellino in Campania and from Collio and Colli Orientali del Friuli. Among the finest 2009 white wines I tasted were the Alberto Longo Falanghina “Le Fossette” from Puglia; Monte de Grazia Bianco, a blend of local indigenous grapes from the Amalfi Coast including Peppela, Ginestra and Tenera; the Mastroberardino Fiano di Avellino “Radici”; the I Clivi Verduzzo Friulano, a dry version of this grape that is normally vinified dry (I Clivi is doing wonderful things with several grapes from their vineyards in Collio and Colli Orientali del Friuli – this winery will not be a well-kept secret for long) and the Gradis’ciutta Sauvignon from Collio.

This last estate is managed by Robert Princic, who at 34 years of age has become one of the most important vintners in Collio, a great white wine area. This Sauvignon is a brilliant wine, offering aromas of spearmint, bosc pear and ginger with excellent concentration, a lengthy finish and vibrant acidity. Look for this wine to be at its best in 5-7 years.

Stunning 2008 whites

There are always some exceptional Italian whites that are released a bit later than the normal wines; given the complexity and structure of these wines, they are ideal when they are initially offered some 18 months after the harvest. The finest at this fair included Bastianich “Vespa”, a blend of Chardonnay, Sauvignon and Picolit from Friuli; the exceptional Grattamacco Vermentino from Bolgheri and the stunning Marisa Cuomo “Fior’duva”. an Amalfi Coast offering made from Ginestra, Ripole and Fenile. This is as lush and as concentrated a version of this wine I have enjoyed and it should once again be in the running for one of the best Italian white wines of the year.

Amarone

There are just too many wines to try at the fair, so it’s difficult to focus on one category. I didn’t try as many Amarones as I would have liked, but the two best for me were the 2006 Tedeschi “Monte Olmi”, full of ripe cherry fruit and peppery notes and the 2004 “Il Fornetto” from Stefano Accordini. This last wine is a true riserva, produced in only the finest years. This is a robust, full-bodied wine with impeccable balance and is a great Amarone from one of the area’s most dependably consistent producers – one that should be better known.

Cantine Lunae Vermentino Nero Rosato (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Vermentino Nero

Yes, you read that right – there is a Vermentino Nero grape that is planted in tiny numbers in Liguria and Tuscany’s western coast. The bottling I tasted is from Cantine Lunae of Liguria, also the home of brillliant examples of Vermentino Bianco.

This is a rosato, as the Vermentino Nero grape does not have the structure to produce a red wine, as the winery’s export manager, Michele Gianazza, explained to me (hope you’re not disappointed, Jeremy). Che un rosato! This has a deep cherry color, aromas of bing cherry, chrysanthemum and mint and finishes very dry. What a pleasure to try this rarity!

A Stunning Dessert Wine from Soave

Ca’Rugate in Soave makes one of the very best examples of Recioto di Soave, the famed DOCG dessert wine of the area. Now comes the 2001 Corte Durlo, an amazing wine, a 100% Garganega made from dried grapes that have been aged in small barrels that have been sealed for seven years. My notes for this wine go on and on; aromas of creme caramel and dried sherry with notes of honey and mandarin orange in the finsh; I think this should drink well for 12-15 years and it could go on for 20 years! This is basically a Vin Santo; however, it is not legal to label the wine this way in Soave, so it is technically a Veneto Bianco Passito. Regardless, this can compare with the finest examples of any dessert wine produced today in Italy.

Matteo Vezzola, Winemaker, Bellavista (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

A Brilliant Franciacorta

If I had to name one wine that was my favorite at this year’s best fair, it was the 2002 Bellavista “Vittorio Moretti”. I tasted through the lineup of Gran Cuvée bottlings from this producer and then was asked if I wanted to taste one more wine. When I was told what it was, I had honestly never heard of it; I’m sure I’m not alone as this is only the sixth time this wine has been made in the winery’s 33 year existence. Named for Bellavista’s owner, the wine is an equal blend of Chardonnay and Pinot Nero that was partially barrel fermented. The lip of the bottle has two levels, meaning that the normal crown cap used to seal the bottle ater the first fermentation cannot be implicated here; rather a cork is used and the wine is manually disgorged.

The wine itself is full-bodied, with sublime aromas of yeast, biscuit, quince and dried pear. I told winemaker Matteo Vezzola that while I didn’t mean to compare Franciacorta with Champagne, as they are two different products, that this wine reminded me of Taittinger Comtes de Champagne. Matteo smiled and said that my comparison was fine with him!

A brilliant wine from a brilliant producer – bravo Matteo!

April 16, 2010 at 8:58 pm 2 comments

The Decade’s Best Producers – Part Three

 

Alois Lageder (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Here is part three of my list of the Top Italian Wine Producers from the first decade of the millennium:

ALTO ADIGE

Alois Lageder

One of the most thoughtful and considerate men I have ever met, Alois Lageder has been producing wines of wonderful varietal purity and clarity for the past two decades. His “Benefizium” Pinot Grigio is one of the two or three finest examples of this variety in Italy, while his “Cor Romigberg” is a stunning cool climate Cabernet Sauvignon. This past decade, Lageder increased his efforts with organically produced wines. Individuals such as Alois Lageder are rare – his wines reflect his thoughtful nature.

Elena Walch

Elena Walch and her husband Werner continue to dazzle with their lineup of wines, especially with the “Kastelaz” Gewurztraminer, the “Castel Ringberg” Sauvignon and the superb blended white, “Beyond the Clouds.” Consistent excellence is what this estate is all about!

Cantina Tramin

Winemaker Willi Sturz quietly continues his brilliant work at this great cooperative winery. The “Nussbaumer” Gewurztraminer is one of Italy’s best white wines, while the blended white “Stoan” is another exceptional offering. Also highly recommended are the “Urban” Lagrein and the “Montan” Sauvignon. These wines represent the heart and soul of Alto Adige.

VENETO

Masi

Under the leadership of Sandro Boscaini, this estate continues to be one of the leaders of Amarone. The regular bottling known as “Costasera” is beautifully balanced, while the cru bottlings, “Campolongo di Torbe” and “Mazzano” are more powerful, yet still quite refined. 

Anselmi

It’s a bit of a broken record, but Roerto Anselmi continues to dazzle with his Garganega-based whites, especially the simple “San Vicenzo” and the “Capitel Foscarino.” Then there is the gorgeous dessert offering “I Capitelli.” A benchmark producer, to be sure.

Roberto Anselmi and his daughter Lisa (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Stefano Accordini

Modern style Amarone, but with nicely integrated oak, unlike some of his competitors. The “Acinatico” bottling is first-rate and ages beautifully, while the “Il Fornetto” made in the finest vintages, is a classic. Also look for his superb Recioto della Valpolicella.

Pieropan

How nice to know that Leonildo Pieropan still makes one of the classic bottlings of Soave Classico and prices it for everyday consumption! His top bottlings of Soave, “La Rocca” and “Calvarino” are exotic, deeply concentrated and ageworthy.

Ca’ La Bionda

Pietro and Alessandro Castellani produce traditionally styled, elegant, sumptuous bottlings of Amarone that are a sheer pleasure to consume. The “Ravazzol” bottling is outstanding, while the regular bottling of Amarone is excellent. Also worth seeking out are his bottlings of Valpolicella (no Ripasso here).

Ca’ Rugate

Under the winemaking talent of Michele Tessari, Ca’ Rugate has become one of the leading producers of Soave. There’s so much here to love, from the stainless steel-aged “San Michele” (a wonderful value) to the oak-aged “Monte Alto” to the lush; lightly sweet “La Perlara”, one of the finest bottlings of Recioto di Soave, this is a model for other Soave producers. Lately, reds have become a major part of this estates as well including a delicious Valpolicella and a delightful Amarone.

UMBRIA

Antonelli

Beautiful, traditionally made bottlings of Sagrantino di Montefalco, a rich, complex red wine that is one of Italy’s finest and unfortuntely, most underrated. The Montefalco Rosso is also worth seeking out, as is the velvety Passito.

Scacciadiavoli

Always a very good producer, this has become an excellent one, thanks in part to the winemaking talent of Stefano Chioccoli. Round, ripe and flavorful, these are modern offerings, but maintain the character of the Sagrantino grape. The Passito is delicious!


January 14, 2010 at 12:16 pm 2 comments


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