Posts tagged ‘silvio piona’

Bardolino – Variety, Value and Charm

_IGP3437Silvio Piona, Az. Agr. Albino Piona (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I wonder how many Italian wine lovers pay much attention to Bardolino. I know I don’t try as much of it as I’d like to. There isn’t much attention paid to this wine and that’s a shame, as it’s quite charming as well as being very affordable, but it’s also a wine that can age for 5-7 years or even longer when it comes to the best producers and the finest vintages.

I recently attended an anteprima (preview) tasting in Bardolino; the purpose here was for journalists to sample the soon-to-be-released bottlings from the 2013 vintage. I am fortunate enough to attend several of these tastings each year in Italy, but it’s usually for a more powerful red wine, such as Barolo, Brunello, Taurasi or Amarone, so I looked forward to trying more of a medium-bodied red; I also wanted to discover the various styles of Bardolino available, as I was only familiar with a handful of the area’s producers.

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Along with Bardolino, the tasting also featured two other wines made in the zone: Bardolino Chiaretto, the famous local rosato, and Bardolino Chiaretto spumante, the sparkling version of the rosato. (This tasting also featured the 2013 versions of Custoza, a local white also made by many Bardolino producers. I will deal with this in another post quite soon).

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I’ll start with the Bardolino Chiaretto spumante. I had literally only tasted fewer than a half-dozen examples before this event, so as I am a sparkling wine lover, I wanted to get a grasp on this wine. Any Bardolino is primarily made from two grapes, Corvina and Rondinella, while a small percentage of Molinara is also part of the blend from some producers (these are the same grapes used in the Valpolicella district to the east). So the Chiaretto spumante is the sparkling rosato version of Bardolino; the wines vary in color from bright pink to deep copper and sweetness levels range from off-dry to medium-sweet.

Maybe it was the warm weather in the beautiful town of Lasize where this tasting was held, but I enjoyed these wines very much. Actually, I would have loved these wines even if the day was cold and rainy – the wines were quite enjoyable. I just love being able to sample such fun wines such as this! You don’t think about Bardolino Chiaretto Spumante – you just drink it! How nice is that, given how serious many of us get at times when we rhapsodize about the wines we come across?

While there were a few examples that were a little too sweet for me, I was impressed by the majority of these spumanti. Most were quite good and there were a few examples that had a bit more depth of fruit and complexity and were drier than the standard version. The finest for me were the bottlings from Corte Gioliare, Monte del Fra “La Picia” and especially the Le Tende “Volutte” (pictured above). This last wine is absolutely delicious and it’s also dry with excellent complexity and persistence. While most of these wines are meant for consumption within 12-15 months, the Le Tende version actually has the structure to drink well for as long as two years from now. Maybe it’s the fact that proprietor Mauro Fortuna has a friend in the Valdobbiadene area in northern Veneto where the finest examples of Prosecco are from, produce this wine. Whatever the case, this is a marvelous wine to be enjoyed on its own before dinner or with an outdoors lunch or even with sushi, tuna or salumi.

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Now on to the traditional Bardolino Chiaretto, the non-sparkling wine. This has long been a calling card for the area’s producers, as this rosato is one of the most well-known in all of Italy. Delicate and fruit-filled, this is a delight with a wide range of foods such as risotto, tortellini and pizza.

I did like some of these Chiaretti - I’ll mention those in a bit – but I was somewhat disappointed in the overall quality of the wines I tasted that day. Too many were candied in nature, while a few were a bit cloyingly sweet; I compared some of these examples to white zinfandel, a wine I largely dislike, so that’s not a good thing.

The best were from top producers such as Le FragheLe TendeAlbino Piona and Costadoro. Here were rosati that were medium-bodied with pleasing perfumes of strawberry, cherry, pear and red poppies. These were dry or off-dry and were nicely balanced with good acidity. These were a pleasure to taste; I just wish there were more examples like these.

_IGP3410Carlo Nerozzi, Le Vigne di San Pietro (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

As for Bardolino itself, I was pleased with the overall quality of the wines. While you may think most examples of Bardolino are pretty much the same, given its image as a lighter red, that’s not the case. There are some meant for immediate consumption over the first 12-15 months, but there are many others that are much better with two to three – or even five – years down the road.

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Matilde Poggi, Le Fraghe (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

The finest examples of 2013 Bardolino I tasted at this event were from Le Tende (this producer is certainly one of Bardolino’s shining stars), Le Fraghe (proprietor Matilde Poggi never fails at crafting a lovely Bardolino of great typicity), Le Vigne di San Pietro and Albino Piona (as with the above names, the Piona estate is on the short list of the area’s finest producers).

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Giovanna Tantini (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I would also like to make an important point about aging Bardolino; while you may think it’s meant for lunch or dinner tonight, it does drink well after a few years. The 2009 bottling from Albino Piona is a delight at present, while the 2009 from Giovanna Tantini is also quite impressive. The Piona bottling is so delightful, with its dried cherry and rose petal notes (along with a hint of pepper); there is excellent complexity and the acidity is quite good, giving this wine a lovely balance. When I speak of Bardolino being a charming wine, here is a textbook example.

The Tantini has more tannins; her style of crafting Bardolino is to let these wines age for 3-5 years (or longer) to let the tannins subside, while the wine gains in complexity, both in the nose and on the palate. This wine at almost five years old, still displays a lovely youthful garnet color and has enticing aromas of a freshly baked cherry pie. This is a lovely wine, one with the stuffing and structure to age for another 5-7 years. That’s not what you expect from Bardolino, so take note – Bardolino can age well. Brava, Giovanna!

March 23, 2014 at 11:50 am 2 comments


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