Posts tagged ‘pinot nero’

The Latest from Alto Adige – Excellence Defined (Part Two)

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Vineyards in the St. Magdalener district, Alto Adige (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

My last post dealt with the best whites wines I sampled at the recent Bozner Weinkost tasting in Bolzano in mid-March; for this post, I will write about the top reds as well as a few rosés and dessert wines.

Most people are surprised to learn that a majority of the grapes planted in Alto Adige are red, not white. This is largely because of an indigenous variety known as Schiava or Vernatsch. The total acreage for this variety was once quite large, but has decreased over the past few decades, as more white varieties are being planted. Still this variety is an important one in Alto Adige; lightly colored, is is quite light in tannins and is produced a light to medium-bodied red that can often be served chilled.

The grape is cultivated throughout Alto Adige and in many cases is labeled as Vernatsch. However there are a few zones where Schiava is the basis of a particular district wine, such as Kalterer See (Auslese); this is from the Lago di Caldaro zone. Another is the St. Magdalener (aka Santa Maddalena) district, located farther north, not far from Bolzano.

Two other red varieties that perform well in Alto Adige are Lagrein and Pinot Nero. Lagrein is grown in many sections of the regions, with the Gries sub-zone of Bolzano being quite famous. Wines made from Lagrein are deep purple in appearance with heady, fruit-dominated aromas of black plum, black raspberry and tar. Medium-full, these are wines that tend to need a few years to settle down. There are also some excellent rosés made from Lagrein.

Pinot Nero is of course, Pinot Noir and Alto Adige is clearly the finest region in Italy for this variety. The cool climate is ideal for long growing seasons in most years that yield wines with dazzling aromatics as well as beautiful acidity. and Theses are ageworthy wines and the finest examples in my mind, rank with some of the world’s most renowned.

Here are notes on some of the best examples of these I tasted at the event in Bolzano:

 

Vernatsch – J. Hofstatter is famous for its Gewurztraminer and Pinot Nero, but the 2013 Vernatsch “Kolbenhofer” is also excellent; with its cranberry, leather and nutmeg aromas, this medium-bodied red makes for irresistible drinking over the next 2-3 years. The 2013 Cantina Tramin Schiava (Schiava is a synonym for Vernatsch) “Fresinger” is a lovely wine with cinnamon and strawberry flavors and very light tannins; enjoy over the next 2-3 years.

As for examples of Santa Maddalena I enjoyed, there were several including the Cantina Bolzano “Huck am Bach 2013, with its damson plum and thyme notes along with the Franz Gojer “Rondell” 2012, a lovely wine with impressive complexity and notable persistence.

Even better were the Tenuta Waldgries 2013 and the A. Egger-Ramer “Reisseger” 2012. The former has intriguing notes of tobacco and thyme and is quite elegant- this is a wine that displays lovely finesse! The latter has beautiful perfumes of cherry, cranberry and red poppies, offers very good acidity with bright fruit and is beautifully balanced. This has a bit more weight to it than many other examples of Santa Maddalena; this will drink well for 3-5 years.

 

 

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Vineyards situated just outside the city of Bolzano (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Pinot Nero - I love this variety and there are so many wonderful examples from Alto Adige, as evidenced again at this event. The Elena Walch “Ludwig” 2011 is a delight, with notes of red cherry, cardamom and a hint of bacon in the aromas. Nicely balanced, this is a pleasure to enjoy now or over the next 3-5 years. Two examples from Girlan, the “Trattmann” and the “Sandbichler” (both 2011) are medium-full with expressive varietal fruit aromas and distinct spicy notes on the palate and in the finish.

Among the very best were the J. Hofstatter “Barthenau Vigna S. Urbano” 2011 and the Marinushof 2011. The former has been one of the finest examples of Alto Adige Pinot Nero for years now; medium-full with abundant red cherry and plum fruit, this has excellent complexity and will be at iys best in 7-10 years, perhaps longer. The Marinushof is notable for its floral aromas, very good acidity and remarkable elegance; this will drink well for 5-7 years.

Finally, the Manincor “Mason di Mason” 2011 is one of the most refined of all Alto Adige Pinot Nero. This is the top selection of Pinot Nero for this producer and is only made in the best years; very Cotes-de-Beaune like, this has a long finish, very good acidity and excellent persistence and complexity. This has at least 7-10 years of drinking pleasure ahead of it.

Lagrein – Now for my notes on Lagrein. I described the characteristics of this variety above; it’s quite different from Schiava and Pinot Nero. I’d have to say it’s not my favorite, as I prefer a more delicate wine, but there are a good number of examples of Lagrein that I did enjoy at this event. Among these were two releases from A. Egger-Ramer, specifically the “Weingut Kristan” 2012 and 2011. Deep purple with aromas of black plum, tar and licorice, both of these wines have very good acidity to balance the tannins; the 2012 is a bit more refined, but both are well made wines that offer mid-term pleasure (5-7 years).

I also liked two wines from Fliederhof, the 2012 and the 2011 Riserva. These are big, lush, extremely ripe styles of Lagrein; on paper, I might not think I’d care for these wines. Yet along with their abundant fruit, they are nicely balanced wines and are quite tasty. You’d need some rich meats to pair with these wines, but for this style of Lagrein, they are well made.

Lagrein Rosé – I love rosé wines and thankfully, there are a good number of Alto Adige producers who do as well. The finest rosés here are made from Lagrein; this grapes assures a deep color for the rosé as well as a lot of character. I enjoyed just about every example I tasted at this event, in particular the A. Egger 2013, a delicious, remarkanle elegant wine; the Schmid Oberrautner 2013, a rich, “serious” rosé with excellent persistence and the Larcherhof 2012 with its cherry/berry aromas and very good acidity. All of these examples are quite dry and can be paired at the dinner table with many types of food. They’re also quite delicious on their own!

Finally, two examples of Moscato Rosa. You may be familiar with Moscato from other part of Italy (especially Moscato d’Asti from Piemonte), but you owe it to yourself to try Moscato Rosa. This grape yields a dessert wine that usually has only a trace of sweetness; there is almost always very good acidity for balance; add to that the heavenly aromas of plum, cherry and red flowers (poppies, carnations) and you have a very seductive wine! Two examples were offered at this event – the Abbazia di Novacella “Praepositus” 2011 and the Tenuta Waldgries 2010 - and both were wonderful wines with excellent complexity and a beautiful delicate feel on the palate.The tend to drink well at 5-7 years of age, although these may be in fine shape a decade from now.

Given the amazing array of wines at this event – white, red, sparkling, rosé and dessert, I’d rank this as just about my favorite wine tasting in Italy. I will certainly return!

Thank you to Thomas Augscholl for his assistance regarding this event as well as my entire stay in Alto Adige.

March 31, 2014 at 8:53 am Leave a comment

Elegant and Distinctive Reds from Alto Adige

Vineyards at Cantina Terlano, Alto Adige (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

When you think about the best red wines of Italy, you probably look to Piedmont and Tuscany or perhaps even Abruzzo, Umbria or Puglia. But when it comes to Alto Adige, white wine is most likely your strongest association with this far northern region. Yet, this area is home to several red varieties that are made into some of the country’s most expressive wines, offerings that are beautifully balanced, adapt perfectly with so many foods and best of all, are wonderfully expressive.

The variety of red wines in Alto Adige is quite amazing, ranging from the very delicate wines made from the Schiava variety with its pleasing cherry and currant fruit and extremely light tannins to Cabernet Sauvignon, which expresses the power and intensity you find from other regions around the world, along with higher acidity than many of its counterparts.

But for this post, I’d like to concentrate on two varieties that have become specialties in Alto Adige: Pinot Nero (Pinot Noir) and Lagrein. Pinot Nero of course is the same variety that is grown in Burgundy as well as a few other areas around the world, from Central Otago in New Zealand to Casablanca Valley in Chile as well as the Willamette Valley in Oregon and several zones in California. Alto Adige is a natural spot for Pinot Nero (sometimes labeled with its German name Blauburgunder), as this is a cool climate wine region, espcially being so far north in Italy as well as being situated in the shadow of the Dolomite Mountains. Examples of Pinot Nero from Alto Adige range from the delicate, light tannin style you can chill for a bit to the more medium-full and full-bodied versions that receive small oak barrel aging and can be aged for 7-10 years or even longer.

Here are notes on a few impressive examples of Alto Adige Pinot Nero I’ve tasted recently:

2010 Cantina Tramin  – This is the entry level Pinot Nero from this outstanding cooperative producer, located in the town of Tramin. Medium-bodied with pleasing aromas of bing cherry, dried strawberry and rhubarb, this has good varietal character with light tannins and a subtle touch of oregano in the finish. You could chill this for 15-20 minutes or so before serving; it’s best paired with lighter chicken and pork dishes (especially in a Thai restaurant) or with a light preparation of tuna. ($19)

2009 Caldaro “Saltner” – This is richer and riper than the above wine, displaying aromas of red cherry, red currant and thyme. Medium-full, this is a nicely structured wine with distinct notes of paprika and turmeric; the acidity is quite good and the oak is nicely integrated. This can stand up to foods such as roast pork, veal or yellowfin tuna. Enjoy this over the next 2-3 years. ($28)

 Martin Foradori, J. Hofstatter (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

2008 J. Hofstatter “Vigna S. Urbano Barthenau”

Martin Foradori, proprietor and winemaker at the J. Hofstatter estate, calls this wine the “flagship” of his production; to me, this is evidence of how great Pinot Noir can be in Alto Adige. The vines in the vineyard are 65 years old, which naturally produces a small yield as well as remarkably concentrated fruit. Full-bodied, this has aromas of tart cherry and strawberry along with lovely notes of coriander and marjoram. Here is a Pinot Nero with outstanding complexity, ideal balance and the structure to age for 15-20 years. Pair this with everything from duck with cherry or orange sauce, pork medallions, salmon or tuna steaks. ($80 – note that this wine is extremely limited. If you find another vintage such as 2007 or 2006, go for it!)

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And, two recommendations of Lagrein:

2009 Valle Isarco – I truly believe Lagrein can be a great success in America as the wines made from this variety have deep color, good ripe black and red fruit and moderate tannins- as a rule, these are drinkable upon release. Here’s a very good example, one with bright ruby red color and beautiful aromas of black plum, licorice, tar and tobacco. Medium-bodied with good acidity and moderate tannins, this has pleasing notes of bitter chocolate in the finish. Enjoy this over the next 2-3 years with most red meats, especially a lighter cut of beef or with eggplant parmigiana. ($20)

2007 Cantina Terlano “Gries Riserva”

Bright purple with aromas of black plum, iodine and black raspberry. Medium-full, this has very good ripeness, elegant middle-weight tannins, good acidity, subtle wood and a touch of bitter chocolate in the finish (a nice touch found in many examples of this wine). This is approachable now, but will be even better in 2-3 years as it round out. Pair this with lighter game, most red meats or hearty stews. ($30)

February 14, 2012 at 4:22 pm 3 comments

Franciacorta

Vineyards of Le Marchesine, Passirano, Franciacorta

You may not realize it, but sparkling wine is produced throughout Italy, from many different varieties. From Campania to Piemonte, from varieties such as Falanghina and Aspirinio to even Nebbiolo, there is a wide variety of bubblies that can be found in various locales in the country. But for world-class quality, there is no question as to which Italian sparkling wine is the finest – the answer is Franciacorta.

What makes Franciacorta so special is the fact that this is a sparkling wine made in the classic method – as in Champagne – where the secondary fermentation is made in the bottle and not in a tank, as with sparklers made according to the Charmat process. Franciacorta can be produced from three varieties: Chardonnay, Pinot Nero (Pinot Noir) and Pinot Bianco and is it made in many different versions, be it a traditional Brut or a Rosé (minimum 25% Pinot Nero for a Rosé, though most bottlings have a much higher percentage of this variety) to Satén (literally “satin”), a wine produced solely from white grapes. If a Franciacorta bears a vintage on the label, it is known as a Millesimato. Franciacorta was awarded DOC status in 1967 and the DOCG designation in 1995.

The Franciacorta production zone is in the province of Lombardia in northern Italy with vineyards located south of Lago d’Iseo. The plantings are on low-lying hills and are primarily in modern planting systems such as cordon spur or Guyot, the ancient overhead system of pergola, though still present in small numbers, is disappearing.

Franciacorta, by the way, refers to three things: it is the name of the growing area, the name of the production process and the name of the wine. There are only ten such wines in all of Europe and only three of them are sparkling wines made by refermentation in the bottle: Cava from Spain, Champagne and Franciacorta.

As for the production method, there are strict regulations, as the minimum aging on the yeasts in the bottle is 18 months (most special bottlings are aged for a much longer time) and as stated before, secondary fermentation must take place in the bottle. The long aging on the yeasts certainly increases complexity and adds a note of minerality that is found in most examples.

Matteo Vezzola, winemaker, Bellavista (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Here is a short list of the finest producers of Franciacorta:

Bellavista

Ca’ del Bosco

Le Marchesine

Monte Rossa

Ricci Curbastro

Ferghettina

Enrico Gatti

San Cristoforo

Le Cantorié

Vezzoli

Guido Berlucchi

Il Mosnel

Camossi

Andrea Arici

As with most sparkling wines, the products are best enjoyed within 2-3 years of disgorgement. Some of the finest bottlings, made from vines with as much as 40 years of age as well as those aged longer on their yeasts, can be enjoyed for 5-7 years after disgorgement and perhaps even as long as a decade. Even the most straightforward examples of Franciacorta have lovely natural acidity and some examples are extremely high in acidity, with the result being wines that edge toward being a bit austere in the mouth.

Given the production methods as well as the overall quality of these wines, there is the inevitable comparison with Champagne. Yet many producers shy away from this assessment. At a recent seminar I moderated in Chicago, Andrea Biatta of Le Marchesine stated, “We are not trying to make Champagne, we are making Franciacorta.” When I asked him about the comparison of the two sparkling wine types, he seemed as he wanted no part in making such an evaluation.

I can understand that, but when I taste a product such as the Le Marchesine Rosé Millesimato, the Pas Dosé (no dosage) from Bellavista, the Cuvée Annamaria Clementi from Ca’ del Bosco or the 2008 Zerodosaggio from Andrea Arici, I can’t help but think of Champagne, both in terms of quality and style.

However you view this, you can’t help but admire the work these producers have done in making Franciacorta one of the world’s great sparkling wines in a period of less than half a century.

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On a separate note, I reached a bit of a milestone recently, as there were more than 5000 hits for this blog in October, making this the first time that has happened. I want to thank everyone that stopped by to take a look and read what I wrote – it is greatly appreciated!

Now I’d like to ask all of you for a comment now and then, as I’m interested to read what people think. It doesn’t have to be anything profound, as a simple, “nice post” or “enjoyed it” will suffice. You’ll make a middle-aged wine writer happy and you know what? You’ll feel better about yourself after leaving a brief comment. Try it and you’ll see what I mean!

November 1, 2011 at 11:24 am 15 comments

Alto Adige Class

Vineyards at Cantina Terlano (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Two lovely wines to discuss today from one of the world’s most beautiful wine regions, Alto Adige. This stunning area, in northern Italy, bordering Austria, is famous for its bilingual use of Italian and German (the region is also known as Südtirol); in fact, in the early part of the twentieth century, Alto Adige was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire (it was annexed by Italy following the end of the First World War).

Being situated so far north, Alto Adige is quite cool, which makes this an ideal region for the production of white wines along with reds that are better suited to a moderate climate, such as Pinot Noir (known as Pinot Nero in Italy). While Pinot Noir is not common throughout Italy, it is a featured variety in Alto Adige and there are several producers, both large and small, that consistently craft excellent bottlings.

I recently tasted the just released 2009 Pinot Nero from Cantina Terlano (also known as Kellerei Terlan in German), one of Alto Adige’s finest producers. This is their regular bottling of Pinot Nero, the other is a Riserva bottling known as Montigl) and while I look forward to that special wine, I am in love with this regular bottling!

2009 was a superb vintage for whites throughout Alto Adige and much of Italy (it may even turn out to be a spectacular one), as the wines have impressive concentration, lovely texture, ideal acidity and remarkable structure. Thus it should be no surprise that a cool-climate, early ripening variety such as Pinot Nero should also be a notable success in Italy in 2009. My notes for this wine are as follows:

Pale garnet with aromas of bing cherry, strawberry candy and carnation. Medium-bodied, this is a delicious Pinot Noir with tasty fresh red cherry fruit, tart acidity and moderate tannins. Elegantly styled with just a touch of red spice in the finish. Approachable now, this is a real treat and is styled for so many types of foods, from poultry and lighter game to lighter tuna preparations. Enjoy over the next 2-3 years, best fresh.

I rate this wine as excellent; what I love most about this bottling is its varietal purity and instant satisfaction from the inviting aromas to the delicious flavors on the palate. This is an excellent value at $25 and has more character than most California or Oregon Pinot Noirs at twice the price! (Note: the wine is labeled as Pinot Noir on the front and Pinot Nero on the back- this is for the American market).

The second wine I am recommending is the 2008 Sauvignon “Andrius” from Cantina Andriano (in Italy, Sauvignon is Sauvignon Blanc). Sauvignon from this cool climate always has beautiful structure as well as very good acidity and in a excellent year such as 2008, beautiful perfumes as well. My notes on this wine:

Bright yellow with aromas of yellow pepper, gooseberry and golden poppies. Medium-full with good to very good concentration. Elegant entry on the palate and a lengthy finish with good acidity and persistence. Nicely styled for many types of food. Enjoy over the next 2-3 years.

This is a rich, lush, almost muscular Sauvignon that I would pair with foods ranging from risotto with shrimp or scallops all the way to veal medallions. I’m very impressed by the wine, though I’d like to see this priced at a bit less than $44, but this is a limited wine and thus an expensive category.

These are two of the most notable releases I’ve tried from Alto Adige as of late; I look forward to trying more new wines over the next few months. What I love best about the wines from Alto Adige are their balance and suitability with food. I’ve never been a fan of wines that have been styled to receive a high score in a magazine; rather, give me a wine that marries well with a variety of foods – that’s what Alto Adige does best!

(Note: In 2008, Cantina Terlano purchased Cantina Andriano. The wines are vinified separately because of each estate’s history an terroir.)

November 2, 2010 at 2:09 pm Leave a comment

Italian Varieties – P to S

Sagrantino vineyards near Montefalco (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Sagrantino vineyards near Montefalco (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

P

Pecorino

White variety from Abruzzo and Marche. Generally aged in stainless steel, though some vinters barrel age it, achieving a creaminess. Pear and apple aromas.

Piedirosso

Lovely red variety of Campania, literally meaning “red feet,” a descriptor for the birds that sit on the vines when they eat the ripe berries. High acid, light tannins and charming fruit flavors of raspberry, cranberry and black cherry. Primarily used as a blending varietal; in small percentages (less than 15%), it cuts the aggressive tannic bite of Aglianico in the great Campanian red, Taurasi. It is also the primary variety in the medium-bodied Lacryma Christi del Vesuvio Rosso.

Pigato

One of Liguria’s most important white varieties with flavors of pineapple and pear with notes of herbs (often rosemary).

Pignolo

Red variety of Friuli with big tannins and deep color and flavors of black fruits. Used only by a few producers and often in blends.

Pinot Bianco

The most widely planted white variety in Alto Adige, this has flavors of apples with a touch of spice. Examples vary from light, crisp and refreshing to more serious bottlings with deep fruit concentration and distinct minerality (such as the top examples from producers such as Cantina Terlano, Cantina Tramin and Alois Lageder.)

Pinot Grigio

Wildy popular white variety grown in several regions of Italy, with the finest bottlings coming from the cool northern regions of Alto Adige and Friuli. Flavors of apple, pear and dried flowers with most examples being quite light and simple. A few producers make single vineyard or special selection bottlings that are more complex. (Known as Pinot Gris in France and other countries.)

Pinot Nero

Known almost everwhere else in the world as Pinot Noir, this is a red variety with moderate tanins, cherry/strawberry fruit and high acidity. A few examples from Piemonte and Tuscany, but the best in Italy are from Alto Adige.

Primitivo

Red variety of Puglia, with deep color, black fruits and plenty of spice. Generally found in southern Pugila and often bottled on its own. DNA related to Zinfandel of California.

Prosecco

White variety from Veneto and Friuli used in the production of the sparkling wine of the same name. Flavors of white peach and lemon, aged in steel tanks.

Prugnolo Gentile

The name for Sangiovese in the town of Montepulciano (used in the wine Vino Nobile di Montepulciano.)

 

R

Refosco

The complete name of this variety is Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso – or “Refosco with a red stalk.” Yields wines of big spice, red fruit and distinctive tannins.

Ribolla Gialla

Charming white variety of Friuli that produces light to medium-bodied wines with high acidity and flavors of pear, lemon, chamomile and dried flowers.

Rondinella

One of the major red varieties of the Valpolicella district with deep color and good fruit (red cherry) intensity and moderate tannins.

Ruché

Rarely seen red variety grown near Asti in Piemonte that makes a lightly spicy, high acid red.

 

S

Sagrantino

Red variety of Umbria, grown only in the Montefalco area. Known for its intense tannins, Sagrantino is even more tannic than Nebbiolo. Cherry fruit and distinct spiciness as well. Sagrantino is made in both a dry and sweet (passito) version.

Ripe Sagrantino Grapes (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Ripe Sagrantino Grapes (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Sangiovese

One of Italy’s most famous and widely planted red varieties, this is best known for its use in three famous Tuscan reds: Chianti, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Brunello di Montalcino. High acid, garnet color and fresh red cherry fruit along with notes of cedar; today some modernists have tweaked Sangiovese to deepen the color and add spice and vanilla from small oak barrels. Sangiovese is also planted in Umbria, Marche and Emilia Romagna.

Sauvignon

Known as Sauvignon Blanc throughout the rest of the world, this white variety is found most famously in Friuli and Alto Adige, where it produces assertive wines with bracing acidity and flavors of asparagus, pea and freshly mown hay. Also grown along the coasts of Tuscany.

Schiava

Red variety from Friuli that produces lighter reds with cherry, currant fruit, high acidity and light tannins. Also known as Vernatsch.

Schioppetino

Red variety of Friuli with big tannins and spice. Only a few producers work with this grape.

Sciasinoso

Red variety of Campania with lively acidity, dark berry fruit and moderate tannins. Usually a blending variety, but also used to make a lightly sparkling red wine.

Susumaniello

Red variety of Puglia with deep purple color and big tannins. Usually part of a blend, but sometimes bottled on its own. Interestingly, the name of the grape is loosely transalted as “the back of a donkey,” perhaps because of its productivity in the vineyard.

 

 


August 19, 2009 at 1:59 pm 2 comments

Alto Adige Reds

In my last post, I discussed the superb whites of Alto Adige; in this post I will deal with this region’s unique red wines.

Most people will be surprised to know that red varieties account for more plantings than white in Alto Adige. The numbers used to be higher, as much of the red plantings were the Schiava grape, which produces lighter, high acid, low tannic reds. This grape is still seen in good numbers, but it is far less important today. Still, a lightly chilled Schiava is a pleasant wine for lighter fare.

PINOT NERO and LAGREIN

The two most important red varities of Alto Adige then are Pinot Nero (Pinot Noir) and Lagrein; these are two very different grapes. 

Few people think about Pinot Nero in Italy, but there are some excellent examples produced in the cool climes of Alto Adige. Many are medium-bodied with pleasant red cherry fruit, high acidity and soft tannins; there wines are meant for comsumption within 2-3 years of the vintage date. But there are a few examples that are from single vineyards (crus) or special selections that have greater depth of fruit, more pronounced aromatics and are more complex in general. These top offerings of Alto Adige Pinot Nero are in the vein of a Burgundy from the Cotes du Beaune and can be enjoyed anywhere from 5-10 years after the vintage.

A few of the best bottlings of Pinot Nero from Alto Adige include:

  • J. Hofstatter “Barthenau Vigna S. Urbano”
  • Colterenzio “Cornell”
  • Alois Lageder “Krafuss”
  • Cantina Tramin “Riserva”
  • Abbazia di Novacella “Praepositus Riserva”

 

LAGREIN

Lagrein is one of Alto Adige’s most unique red varieties, offering rich purple color, ripe black fruit flavors and moderate tannins. Most examples of Lagrein are quite delicious upon release and as the acidity is not too high, they are quite enjoyable on their own, although most work better paired with a variety of red meats. Some examples are medium-bodied and meant for short-term consumption (2-3 years), although many producers also make a richer, riper, more serious version (often aged in small oak barrels) that have more tannin and can age for as long as a decade. 

 

Vineyards at Cantina Terlano, a top producer of Lagrein (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Vineyards at Cantina Terlano, a top producer of Lagrein (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Among the best bottlings of Lagrein in Alto Adige are:

  • Cantina Terlano “Porphyr”
  • Elena Walch “Castel Ringberg Riserva”
  • Cantina Tramin “Urban”
  • Muri-Gries “Abtei-Muri Riserva”
  • Alois Lageder “Lindenburg”
  • J. Hofstatter “Steinraffler”
  • Cantina Bolzano “Taber Riserva”
  • Abbazia di Novacella “Praepositus Riserva”

 

OTHER VARIETIES

A few producers also work with Cabernet Sauvignon; the cool climate here preserves acidity and brings out some of the herbal components of the variety. These are not flashy examples of Caberent Sauvignon, but are well made and tend to age well. Arguably the finest is the “Cor Romigberg” from Alois Lageder, which drink well at 10-12 years after the vintage. 

A few producers also make a varietal Merlot or blend Merlot with Lagrein. 

All in all, the red wines from Alto Adige may not reach the same heights as the region’s whites, but they are of high quality and are quite distinct.

July 19, 2009 at 3:19 pm Leave a comment


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