Posts tagged ‘oddero’

Thoughts on Tre Bicchieri 2015

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The Tre Bicchieri awards of Gambero Rosso have been announced for 2015 and as usual, there are many familiar names on the list along with some welcome new ones. It’s a well thought out list, one that honors Italy’s most famous wine types such as Barolo, Brunello and Amarone along with many excellent wines that normally don’t get the attention they deserve, be it a Muller Thurgau from Trentino or a Falanghina from Campania.

There are now as many as eight major wine guides in Italy and while all of them have their particular merits, Gambero Rosso is still considered the so-called Bible of these. There’s been a lot of discussion about the guide, especially with some internal changes a few years ago, but the tasting panel at the publication continues to do an excellent job. Change is inevitable and sometimes change angers certain people, but the goal of discovering the best Italian wines of the year is still that of Gambero Rosso and their results are always newsworthy and valuable.

 

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Once again, the Enrico Serafino Alta Langa “Zero” is a Tre Bicchieri winner (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Piemonte is the region that leads this year’s results with a total of 79 Tre Bicchieri-winning wines; Toscana follows with 72 and then Veneto with 36, Alto Adige with 28, Friuli with 27, Lombardia with 23, and then Campania with 20. Every region has at least two wines on the list; as you might expect, Molise, the smallest Italian region, has the fewest winners (2).

Piemonte is a deserved number one on the list; of course Barolo and Barbaresco lead the list, but there are also some beautiful whites as well as one excellent sparkling wine. That is the 2008 Enrico Serafino Alta Langa “Sboccatura Tardiva” (late disgorged) Cantina Maestra “Brut Zero.” I’ve had this wine for the last several vintages and have always been impressed with its purity, balance, acidity and complexity; it’s a marvelous Brut, very dry with a long, satisfying finish; it’s also got a lot of finesse. It’s a great example of how good Alta Langa can be and while it’s a shame that there isn’t at least one more Alta Langa on this year’s list, it’s nice to see this wine awarded with the highest honors again (in last year’s guide, it was named the sparking wine of the year).

 

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Mariacristina Oddero (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 Of course, numerous examples of Barolo were on this year’s list; this was not unexpected, given the quality of Barolo from today’s finest producers, but this year the new releases were from the outstanding 2010 vintage. Such examples from 2010 as the Bartolo Mascarello, Michele Chiarlo “Cerequio” and the Aldo Conterno “Romirasco” are brilliant, world-class wines, one that exemplify the amazing quality in this territory.

It was also nice to see a few examples from the great 2008 vintage on the list. 2008 is a classic Piemontese vintage, one that resulted in wines of ideal structure; this was not a vintage for flashy wines, but instead wines that have impressive balance as well as offering their terroirs in great fashion; look for the best 2008 Barolos to drink well for 20-25 years, with a few able to cellar for as long as 35-40 years. Among three of the finest 2008 Barolos that received Tre Bicchieri in the 2015 guide are the Paolo Scavino Rocche dell’Annunziata “Riserva” from La Morra, the Ettore Germano Lazzarito “Riserva” from Serralunga and the Poderi e Cantine Oddero Bussia Vigna Mondoca Riserva. The Scavino has become a classic and the 2008 is an outstanding wine – a well deserved Tre Bicchieri winner. The Germano is a relatively new release for this producer and the wine displays the characteristic spice from this noted Serralunga vineyard – this is also a notable Barolo. The Oddero “Vigna Mondoca” has been on the top of my list of underrated Barolos for years; this has typical Monforte weight and tannins, yet it is not as forceful as many other Barolos from this commune. The 2008 is particularly elegant with the grip and weight to age well for 25 years or more.

 

IMGP1162 Landscape of Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi zone (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I was thrilled to read that 11 examples of Verdicchio were awarded Tre Bicchieri this year. Eleven! I would have expected perhaps five or six, so it’s a positive sign that the tasting panel found so many exemplary example of this marvelous white wines from Marche this year. Famed estates such as BucciGarofoli and Umani Ronchi were once again awarded top honors, but it was also nice to see artisan producers such as Collestefano (Verdicchio di Matelica) and Andrea Felici also receive such recognition. The latter estate was honored for its 2011 Riserva, named “Il Cantico della Figura.” It’s an amazing Verdicchio with superb focus and stunning varietal character. It was one of the three or four finest Italian white wines I tasted this year!

Other estates that received Tre Bicchieri for their Verdicchio included a few that I am not familiar with, such as Tenuta di Tavignano and La Marca di San Michele (Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi) and Borgo Paglianetto (Verdicchio di Matelica), so I will have to get busy and try and acquire these wines. Bravo to the tasting panel at Gambero Rosso  for recognizing the amazing quality of Verdicchio – no other white wine type in Italy received as many Tre Bicchieri awards this year!

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I could go on about how many different wines were honored this year, but there isn’t enough room for all my thoughts. Let me say however, that it’s nice to see Gambero Rosso (as well as other Italian wine guides) honor the beautiful sparkling and white wines from across the country. Yes, Italy is known for its big reds and while they grab a lot of international attention, the sparkling and white wines from the country are just as notable in terms of qualiyt and distinctiveness. Sparkling wines that won top honors this year include several examples of Franciacorta (Bellavista “Cuvée Alma”, Ca’ del Bosco “Annamaria Clementi” Rosé, Ferghettina “Pas Dosé 33″  and Guido Berlucchi “Palazzo della Lana” Satén – a superb wine!). From Trentino, there were also several examples of Trento DOC, including Letrari “Riserva”, Dorigati “Methius Riserva”  and to no one’s surprise, the Giulio Ferrari Riserva del Fondatore, always one of Italy’s finest sparkling wines, one that is world class!

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I was particularly delighted to see that the 2013 La Vis Müller Thurgau “Vigna delle Forche” was awarded a Tre Bicchieri rating. Here is a wine that so defines what Italian viticulture is all about – a distinctive wine of excellent quality produced from a variety that works beautifully in a limited area. Think about Müller Thurgau elsewhere in the world- it’s clearly a third rate grape in Germany (at least in terms of respect – there are some fine versions from Germany) and in New Zealand, they’re ripping out as much as possible to plant more Sauvignon Blanc. Yet in the Cembra Valley of Trentino, a few growers and producers have found this small zone to be an ideal spot for exemplary Müller Thurgau; my friend Fabio Piccoli, an Italian journalist, believes this small valley may be the finest place in the world to grow this variety.

2013 was an outstanding vintage, as it was cool, resulting in wines of striking aromatics, lively acidity and beautiful structure. This is not a big wine – enjoy this by its fifth birthday, but what a marvelous wine with dazzling aromatics of elderflowers, white peach and jasmine! I love this wine with Thai food and how wonderful that the panel at Gambero Rosso can give a wine such as this the same rating as a great Barolo, Brunello di Montalcino or Amarone! (For the record, another Müller-Thurgau, the 2012 “Feldmarschall” from Tiefenbrunner, an excellent Alto Adige producer, also received a Tre Bicchieri rating this year.)

I’ll comment a bit more on a few of the Tre Bicchieri wines in a future post.

November 24, 2014 at 2:11 pm 5 comments

Older Barolo – Terroir, Breeding and Class

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 (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

In a few short weeks, I will be in Alba for a special tasting called Nebbiolo Prima, an anteprima (preview) tasting of hundreds of new releases of wines produced exclusively from Nebbiolo. There will be releases of Roero Rosso from the 2011 vintage as well as similar wines from Barbaresco.

But the highlight of this five-day event will be sampling more than 200 examples of Barolo from the 2010 vintage. This vintage is already being spoken of as a modern-day classic, wines that have the potential to age for as much as 40 or 50 years. In case you believe this is typical wine industry hype for the latest releases, think again. When I attended this event three years ago, when the 2007 Barolos were featured (a very impressive group of wines, in its own right), several producers told me that while they thought I would like their 2007s very much, “wait until you try my 2010s in a few years.” They knew they had something special right from the start and were excited about these wines even in their initial stages, years before release. (I have tasted a handful of these wines – some of them tank samples – so while it’s too early to tell, yes, these wines should be something very special.)

I’ll report on these wines next month, but whenever you taste a new vintage of Barolo, you find yourself comparing it with other vintages, especially ones that are similar in style. Then of course, you size up the vintage for its aging potential. Even in an ordinary year, a well-made Barolo can age for 12-15 years and in most vintages, 15-20 years is the norm. Then you have a few outstanding vintages when the finest examples of Barolo are candidates for 25-40, perhaps even 50 years of aging potential.

Last year, I wanted to try some older Barolos and see how they were tasting after a number of years in the bottle. So with fellow American journalists Tom Maresca and Kerin O’Keefe, we visited nine great Barolo producers and tasted older wines at their cellars. We requested four wines from each producer; the years would cover several decades, ranging from the 1970s and 1980s and well as the 1990s and up to the decade of the 2000s. Each producer had at least four wines for us to taste, some even graciously poured an extra one or two wines; we did not refuse!

Nebbiolo grapes in vineyard in Serralunga d'Alba for production of Barolo (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Nebbiolo grapes in vineyard in Serralunga d’Alba for production of Barolo (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

We sought out an array of great Barolo producers, with a selection that would represent various communes in the Barolo zone. These were the nine cellars we visited: Massolino (Serralunga d’Alba); Giacomo Fenocchio (Monforte d’Alba); Elio Grasso (Monforte d’Alba); Pio Cesare (Alba); Ceretto (Alba); Marcarini (La Morra); Oddero (La Morra); Renato Ratti (La Morra) and Prunotto (Alba). Before Tom and Kerin arrived in the area, I also visited a tenth cellar – Borgogno in the town of Barolo – to taste older examples of their Barolos as well.

A few points about the Barolos we tasted and how these wines have changed over the years. We were able to taste a few examples from 1978, a great vintage that is finally starting to show its best, after more than 35 years. Certainly the winemaking was different in the 1970s, especially in terms of technical approach, but also a philosophical view, as the typical Barolo made some 40-50 years ago was a wine that was rather closed and even a bit backwards upon release. That may or may not be a good thing depending on your view; certainly with the proliferation of powerful wines from California, Australia and other corners of the globe, wines that display forward fruit are the ones that attract the attention of today’s wine media, at least in terms of high scores and important ratings. So some Barolo producers, in order to garner greater attention for their wines, have followed suit to some extent, as examples of this iconic wine from the 1990s and on are more forward and not as tightly wound upon release as in the past. Is this an improvement? Again, this depends on your point of view, but it is a reality.

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Pio Boffa, Pio Cesare Winery (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Another form of reality is climate change; anyone who denies this condition as part of the equation in the Barolo zone is simply overlooking the truth. Each of the producers I spoke with commented on ever warmer temperatures in the area; the only disagreement was when it first occurred. At the Giacomo Fenocchio estate, Claudio Fenocchio said that 1990 was the first vintage he noticed this condition, while for Pio Boffa at the Pio Cesare estate, 1982 was the first year of climate change.

This has resulted in earlier harvests; where Nebbiolo for Barolo had traditionally been picked in mid-late October – and sometimes even early November in some extreme years, those days are pretty much long gone. Harvest these days is often in early October and rarely later then the 2nd or 3rd week of that month. “The biggest change in the Barolos today is the climate,” comments Mariacristina Oddero.


Here are notes on a few of the best wines I tried that week:

2006 – This was a classic Barolo year, one that offered powerful wines meant for the long haul. Beautifully structured wines with very good acidity; the finest should age for 25-35 years.

Oddero “Brunate” Deep garnet; meaty aromas – orange peel and Asian spice. Medium-full with very good concentration. Big mid-palate, though not as concentrated as some of the ’06 Barolos. Very good acidity, subtle wood notes and excellent persistence. Best in 15-20 years – perhaps longer.  ****

Elio Grasso “Gavarini Chiniera” - Deep garnet; aromas of red cherry, marmalade and caraway seed. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Lovely mid-palate, big fruit flavors, perfectly balanced. Very good acidity, subdued wood notes, outstanding persistence. Powerful wine of great breeding and ideal structure. Peak in 25-35 years.  *****


2004 – A brilliant year for Barolo. Wines of amazing aromatic complexities – I recall being as impressed as I had ever been with the perfumes of these wines when I tasted them upon their release – and remarkable elegance. Ideal ripeness along with very good acidity, these are Barolos of grace and finesse. Yet these are not less accomplished than the 2006s, merely less forceful; still, the finest examples of 2004 Barolos will age for 25-40 years.

Franco Massolino

Franco Massolino (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Franco Massolino comments on the 2004 growing season. “In 2004, the weather was simply perfect. It was a wet spring followed by a summer that was not too hot. 2004 is a wine I really like, a combination of power and elegance.”

Claudio Fenocchio labeled the 2004 vintage as “bellissima. It is traditional with great elegance.”

Renato Ratti “Rocche” – Deep garnet; aromas of kirsch, tar and red roses – just beautiful! Excellent concentration with a rich mid-palate. Great fruit persistence with notes of orange peel in the finish. Excellent persistence. Long, long finish; the tannins are remarkably fine. 25 years plus.  *****

Marcarini “Brunate” – Deep garnet; aromas of Oriental spice, dried cherry, orange peel and tar. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Excellent complexity, this has a meaty character to it. Long, finish, great structure, rich, polished tannins, very good acidity, outstanding persistence. 25 years plus.  *****

Massolino “Vigna Rionda” – Lovely pale garnet color, aromas of red cherry, red roses and carnation. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Silky tannins, precise acidity and a long, long, finish. Beautiful harmony of all components and superb varietal purity. 15-20 years -perhaps longer.  ****


1999 - An outstanding Barolo vintage; wines of power and elegance. The 1999s, as well as any vintage in the last twenty years, are beautiful wines that truly reflect their origins.

Aldo Conterno “Romirasco” - Deep garnet; aromas of mocha, mint, red poppies and brown herbs. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Silky tannins, beautiful acidity and fruit – perfectly ripe. Gorgeous balance and outstanding persistence. 25-35 years.  *****

Ceretto “Bricco Rocche” - Deep garnet/light edge; aromas of leather, tar and strawberry jam. Medium-full with very good to excellent concentration. Long finish with supple tannins, excellent complexity and very good acidity. Best in 15-20 years – perhaps longer.  *****


1996 – Another classic year, resulting in wines of great power and varietal purity. Fenocchio, comparing 1996 with 1990, which received brilliant reviews, said “1996 is difficult to describe now. When you compare 1990 and 1996, no one will remember the 1990 ten years from now, but the 1996 will be drinking beautifully.”

Giacomo Fenocchio “Villero” - Deep garnet; aromas of leather, truffle, balsamic, dried cherry and myrtle. Medium-full with very good concentration. Excellent ripeness – sweet fruit – good acidity and rich tannins. Very good acidity with impressive persistence. 25 years plus.  *****

Borgogno Riserva – Deep garnet; aromas of truffle, dried orange peel, dried cherry and a hint of tobacco. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Excellent persistence, still rich, firm tannins. Excellent complexity – lovely wine! Best in 15-20 years.  ****


1989 - A great Barolo vintage, somewhat overshadowed for some years now by the more powerful 1990, but given some time, most of the 1989s are now showing their brilliance. Tremendous depth of fruit with superb structure.

Prunotto (classic Barolo) – Deep garnet/light brown edge; aromas of herbal tea, dried cherry, truffle and tar. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Rich tannins, big persistence, very fine acidity. Excellent balance and still very young. 12-15 years.  ****

Renato Ratti “Conca” - Deep garnet/light edge; aromas of balsamic, tea leaf and licorice. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Huge mid-palate, very powerful wine. Big tannins, very good acidity; outstanding persistence and complexity. Touch of savoury quality. Notes of oregano and sage in the finish. Slightly austere finish, thanks to the amount of tannins. 20-25 years to peak – perhaps longer. Great wine! *****


1978

Pio Cesare - Deep garnet with a light brown edge; aromas of balsamic, dried cherry and cedar. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Rich persistence, lovely balance, very good acidity. Best in 12-15 years.  ****


Ratings –  ***** Outstanding / **** Excellent


I’ve listed just a few of the wines I tasted over the course of a magnificent week in the Barolo zone. Here is the complete list of older Barolos I tasted during that time.

Borgogno – 1998 Riserva, 1996 Riserva, 1982 Riserva

Ceretto – 2004 Bricco Rocche; 1999 Bricco Rocche; 1993 Bricco Rocche; 1989 Bricco Rocche

Pio Cesare – 2000 Barolo; 1996 Barolo; 1989 Barolo, 1978 Barolo

Aldo Conterno – 2005 Gran Bussia Riserva, 2004 Romirasco, 1999 Colonello

Giacomo Fenocchio – 2004 Bussia Riserva; 1996 Villero; 1990 Bussia Riserva; 1978 Barolo Riserva

Elio Grasso - 2006 Gavarini Chiniera; 2004 Gavarini Chiniera; 2001 Ginestra Casa Maté; 1996 Runcot

Marcarini – 2004 Brunate, 1996 Brunate; 1990 Brunate; 1978 Brunate

Massolino – 2004 Vigna Rionda; 1996 Vigna Rionda Riserva “X Anni”; 1989 Vigna Rionda; 1978 Barolo Riserva

Oddero – 2006 Brunate; 2004 Vigna Mondoca Bussia Soprana; 2001 Vigna Mondoca Bussia Soprana; 1998 Vigna Rionda; 1978 Barolo (classic)

Prunotto – 2004 Bussia; 1996 Bussia; 1989 Barolo (classic); 1985 Bussia; 1982 Riserva Bussia; 1978 Riserva Bussia

Renato Ratti - 2008 Rocche; 2004 Rocche; 1999 Rocche Marcenasco; 1998 Rocche Marcenasco; 1990 Marcenasco; 1989 Conca


 

If you would like to read my reviews of all 41 wines as well as reviews of more than 100 Barolos from 2006, 2004 and 2001, as well as reviews of wines from other recent vintages such as the best from 2009, 2007 and 2008, please contact me, as I will be releasing a special issue of my Guide to Italian Wines. This will be published in a pdf file and will be sent to those that pay a small fee. More information can be found by emailing me (click on this link for my email).

 

You won’t want to miss this special Guide to Italian Wines, a complete guide to Barolo in general and the best wines over the past decade.

April 14, 2014 at 9:55 am 2 comments

The Best Barolo You’ve Probably Never Tried

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If you’re a lover of Barolo, you are certainly familiar with great cru offerings from some of the most celebrated producers; these include wines such as Briccco Rocche from Ceretto, Bricco Boschis from Cavallotto, Rocche from Renato Ratti or any one of several from Roberto Voerzio (Brunate, Cerequio, La Serra, et al). There are dozens of other great cru Barolos from many other renowned estates, but one I’m certain most people haven’t heard of is the Bussia Soprana “Vigna Mondoca”  from Oddero.

Located in Santa Maria, a frazione of La Morra, in the heart of the Barolo zone, this distinguished family firm under the direction of Mariacristina and Mariavittoria Oddero has quietly become one of the most consistent and most highly regarded of all Barolo houses. The quality level is routinely excellent and has been steadily improving for the past decade.

Oddero produces as many as six different examples of Barolo per year, including one blended from La Morra and Castiglione grapes along with several cru bottlings, including Villero from Castiglione Falletto, Vigna Rionda from Serralunga d’Alba and Rocche di Castiglione from Castiglione Falletto. These vineyards are quite famous; other producers also craft single vineyard wines from these sites.

But  it is the Bussia Soprana “Vigna Mondoca” that may just be the finest Barolo produced by Oddero, although it is nowhere as famous as their other wines. The vineyard itself is quite unique, comprised of white/grey marls and yellow sands with more limestone than clay. At the top of the hill (1180 feet above sea level), the soils are almost completely white, leading Mariacristina Oddero to comment that  it looks “like lunar soil.”

Maria Cristina Oddero

Mariacristina Oddero (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Oddero acquired their section of this vineyard in 1970 and has never replanted, so the vines are at least 40-45 years old. Typical of a Barolo from the commune of Monforte d’Alba, this is a wine with firm, abundant tannins, so much so that the proprietors have made the decision to hold on to this wine one extra year before releasing it in the market. So while the current release of the other Barolos from Oddero, such as Villero, is 2008 (these were released a few months ago in 2012), the new release for the “Vigna Mondoca” is the 2007 – the 2008 will not be released until the fall of 2013.

I’ve recently tasted the 2007 and 2006 versions of this wine and I rated both as 5-star (outstanding) wines. The 2007 is much more intense and powerful than the typical 2007 Barolo, as this vintage produced many forward wines with medium-weight tannins. But the Oddero “Vigna Mondoca” from 2007 is a wine that needs a lot of time to shed its youthful tannins and settle down; in my notes, I have estimated that peak drinking for this wine will be in 20-25 years.

As for the 2006, this wine really displays its breeding and class along with the intensity and rich concentration of that wonderful vintage. Offering marvelous aromas of currant, dried cherry, balsamic, orange peel and cedar, this is a tightly wrapped wine that is an superb representation of this site;  it is intense, yet beautifully balanced, so the wine should be in excellent condition when it peaks in 25-20 years.

The proprietors mature this wine each vintage in 40, 60 and 75 hectoliter (4000, 6000 and 7500 liter) Slavonian and Austrian oak casks for 30 months; this allows for beautiful expression of terroir, as the large casks let the Nebbiolo fruit characteristics emerge without being overwhelmed by too many wood notes. This gives the wine a unique identity, something that is a shared trait with other great examples of Barolo or many other superb red wines of Italy and the rest of the world.

Compliments to the Oddero family on such a superb wine each vintage. As with anything that is truly great, this is not easy to find (only about 30,000 bottles are produced in a year), but the search will undeniably be worth it!

January 24, 2013 at 10:53 am Leave a comment

“B”eautiful Italian Reds

 

Winter Vineyard Scene, Bolgheri (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Winter Vineyard Scene, Bolgheri (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

Text and photos ©Tom Hyland

This past week I conducted a class at Perman Wine Selections in Chicago that included some of Italy’s finest and most famous wine types. I dubbed the class “Italy’s Killer B’s”; the wines tasted were examples of Brunello, Bolgheri, Barbera, Barbaresco and Barolo. 

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October 5, 2009 at 4:14 pm 2 comments


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