Posts tagged ‘massolino’

Older Barolo – Terroir, Breeding and Class

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 (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

In a few short weeks, I will be in Alba for a special tasting called Nebbiolo Prima, an anteprima (preview) tasting of hundreds of new releases of wines produced exclusively from Nebbiolo. There will be releases of Roero Rosso from the 2011 vintage as well as similar wines from Barbaresco.

But the highlight of this five-day event will be sampling more than 200 examples of Barolo from the 2010 vintage. This vintage is already being spoken of as a modern-day classic, wines that have the potential to age for as much as 40 or 50 years. In case you believe this is typical wine industry hype for the latest releases, think again. When I attended this event three years ago, when the 2007 Barolos were featured (a very impressive group of wines, in its own right), several producers told me that while they thought I would like their 2007s very much, “wait until you try my 2010s in a few years.” They knew they had something special right from the start and were excited about these wines even in their initial stages, years before release. (I have tasted a handful of these wines – some of them tank samples – so while it’s too early to tell, yes, these wines should be something very special.)

I’ll report on these wines next month, but whenever you taste a new vintage of Barolo, you find yourself comparing it with other vintages, especially ones that are similar in style. Then of course, you size up the vintage for its aging potential. Even in an ordinary year, a well-made Barolo can age for 12-15 years and in most vintages, 15-20 years is the norm. Then you have a few outstanding vintages when the finest examples of Barolo are candidates for 25-40, perhaps even 50 years of aging potential.

Last year, I wanted to try some older Barolos and see how they were tasting after a number of years in the bottle. So with fellow American journalists Tom Maresca and Kerin O’Keefe, we visited nine great Barolo producers and tasted older wines at their cellars. We requested four wines from each producer; the years would cover several decades, ranging from the 1970s and 1980s and well as the 1990s and up to the decade of the 2000s. Each producer had at least four wines for us to taste, some even graciously poured an extra one or two wines; we did not refuse!

Nebbiolo grapes in vineyard in Serralunga d'Alba for production of Barolo (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Nebbiolo grapes in vineyard in Serralunga d’Alba for production of Barolo (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

We sought out an array of great Barolo producers, with a selection that would represent various communes in the Barolo zone. These were the nine cellars we visited: Massolino (Serralunga d’Alba); Giacomo Fenocchio (Monforte d’Alba); Elio Grasso (Monforte d’Alba); Pio Cesare (Alba); Ceretto (Alba); Marcarini (La Morra); Oddero (La Morra); Renato Ratti (La Morra) and Prunotto (Alba). Before Tom and Kerin arrived in the area, I also visited a tenth cellar - Borgogno in the town of Barolo – to taste older examples of their Barolos as well.

A few points about the Barolos we tasted and how these wines have changed over the years. We were able to taste a few examples from 1978, a great vintage that is finally starting to show its best, after more than 35 years. Certainly the winemaking was different in the 1970s, especially in terms of technical approach, but also a philosophical view, as the typical Barolo made some 40-50 years ago was a wine that was rather closed and even a bit backwards upon release. That may or may not be a good thing depending on your view; certainly with the proliferation of powerful wines from California, Australia and other corners of the globe, wines that display forward fruit are the ones that attract the attention of today’s wine media, at least in terms of high scores and important ratings. So some Barolo producers, in order to garner greater attention for their wines, have followed suit to some extent, as examples of this iconic wine from the 1990s and on are more forward and not as tightly wound upon release as in the past. Is this an improvement? Again, this depends on your point of view, but it is a reality.

Pio Boffa

Pio Boffa, Pio Cesare Winery (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Another form of reality is climate change; anyone who denies this condition as part of the equation in the Barolo zone is simply overlooking the truth. Each of the producers I spoke with commented on ever warmer temperatures in the area; the only disagreement was when it first occurred. At the Giacomo Fenocchio estate, Claudio Fenocchio said that 1990 was the first vintage he noticed this condition, while for Pio Boffa at the Pio Cesare estate, 1982 was the first year of climate change.

This has resulted in earlier harvests; where Nebbiolo for Barolo had traditionally been picked in mid-late October – and sometimes even early November in some extreme years, those days are pretty much long gone. Harvest these days is often in early October and rarely later then the 2nd or 3rd week of that month. “The biggest change in the Barolos today is the climate,” comments Mariacristina Oddero.


Here are notes on a few of the best wines I tried that week:

2006 - This was a classic Barolo year, one that offered powerful wines meant for the long haul. Beautifully structured wines with very good acidity; the finest should age for 25-35 years.

Oddero “Brunate” Deep garnet; meaty aromas – orange peel and Asian spice. Medium-full with very good concentration. Big mid-palate, though not as concentrated as some of the ’06 Barolos. Very good acidity, subtle wood notes and excellent persistence. Best in 15-20 years – perhaps longer.  ****

Elio Grasso “Gavarini Chiniera” - Deep garnet; aromas of red cherry, marmalade and caraway seed. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Lovely mid-palate, big fruit flavors, perfectly balanced. Very good acidity, subdued wood notes, outstanding persistence. Powerful wine of great breeding and ideal structure. Peak in 25-35 years.  *****


2004 - A brilliant year for Barolo. Wines of amazing aromatic complexities – I recall being as impressed as I had ever been with the perfumes of these wines when I tasted them upon their release – and remarkable elegance. Ideal ripeness along with very good acidity, these are Barolos of grace and finesse. Yet these are not less accomplished than the 2006s, merely less forceful; still, the finest examples of 2004 Barolos will age for 25-40 years.

Franco Massolino

Franco Massolino (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Franco Massolino comments on the 2004 growing season. “In 2004, the weather was simply perfect. It was a wet spring followed by a summer that was not too hot. 2004 is a wine I really like, a combination of power and elegance.”

Claudio Fenocchio labeled the 2004 vintage as “bellissima. It is traditional with great elegance.”

Renato Ratti “Rocche” - Deep garnet; aromas of kirsch, tar and red roses – just beautiful! Excellent concentration with a rich mid-palate. Great fruit persistence with notes of orange peel in the finish. Excellent persistence. Long, long finish; the tannins are remarkably fine. 25 years plus.  *****

Marcarini “Brunate” - Deep garnet; aromas of Oriental spice, dried cherry, orange peel and tar. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Excellent complexity, this has a meaty character to it. Long, finish, great structure, rich, polished tannins, very good acidity, outstanding persistence. 25 years plus.  *****

Massolino “Vigna Rionda” - Lovely pale garnet color, aromas of red cherry, red roses and carnation. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Silky tannins, precise acidity and a long, long, finish. Beautiful harmony of all components and superb varietal purity. 15-20 years -perhaps longer.  ****


1999 - An outstanding Barolo vintage; wines of power and elegance. The 1999s, as well as any vintage in the last twenty years, are beautiful wines that truly reflect their origins.

Aldo Conterno “Romirasco” - Deep garnet; aromas of mocha, mint, red poppies and brown herbs. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Silky tannins, beautiful acidity and fruit – perfectly ripe. Gorgeous balance and outstanding persistence. 25-35 years.  *****

Ceretto “Bricco Rocche” - Deep garnet/light edge; aromas of leather, tar and strawberry jam. Medium-full with very good to excellent concentration. Long finish with supple tannins, excellent complexity and very good acidity. Best in 15-20 years – perhaps longer.  *****


1996 – Another classic year, resulting in wines of great power and varietal purity. Fenocchio, comparing 1996 with 1990, which received brilliant reviews, said “1996 is difficult to describe now. When you compare 1990 and 1996, no one will remember the 1990 ten years from now, but the 1996 will be drinking beautifully.”

Giacomo Fenocchio “Villero” - Deep garnet; aromas of leather, truffle, balsamic, dried cherry and myrtle. Medium-full with very good concentration. Excellent ripeness – sweet fruit – good acidity and rich tannins. Very good acidity with impressive persistence. 25 years plus.  *****

Borgogno Riserva - Deep garnet; aromas of truffle, dried orange peel, dried cherry and a hint of tobacco. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Excellent persistence, still rich, firm tannins. Excellent complexity – lovely wine! Best in 15-20 years.  ****


1989 - A great Barolo vintage, somewhat overshadowed for some years now by the more powerful 1990, but given some time, most of the 1989s are now showing their brilliance. Tremendous depth of fruit with superb structure.

Prunotto (classic Barolo) - Deep garnet/light brown edge; aromas of herbal tea, dried cherry, truffle and tar. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Rich tannins, big persistence, very fine acidity. Excellent balance and still very young. 12-15 years.  ****

Renato Ratti “Conca” - Deep garnet/light edge; aromas of balsamic, tea leaf and licorice. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Huge mid-palate, very powerful wine. Big tannins, very good acidity; outstanding persistence and complexity. Touch of savoury quality. Notes of oregano and sage in the finish. Slightly austere finish, thanks to the amount of tannins. 20-25 years to peak – perhaps longer. Great wine! *****


1978

Pio Cesare - Deep garnet with a light brown edge; aromas of balsamic, dried cherry and cedar. Medium-full with excellent concentration. Rich persistence, lovely balance, very good acidity. Best in 12-15 years.  ****


Ratings –  ***** Outstanding / **** Excellent


I’ve listed just a few of the wines I tasted over the course of a magnificent week in the Barolo zone. Here is the complete list of older Barolos I tasted during that time.

Borgogno - 1998 Riserva, 1996 Riserva, 1982 Riserva

Ceretto - 2004 Bricco Rocche; 1999 Bricco Rocche; 1993 Bricco Rocche; 1989 Bricco Rocche

Pio Cesare - 2000 Barolo; 1996 Barolo; 1989 Barolo, 1978 Barolo

Aldo Conterno - 2005 Gran Bussia Riserva, 2004 Romirasco, 1999 Colonello

Giacomo Fenocchio - 2004 Bussia Riserva; 1996 Villero; 1990 Bussia Riserva; 1978 Barolo Riserva

Elio Grasso - 2006 Gavarini Chiniera; 2004 Gavarini Chiniera; 2001 Ginestra Casa Maté; 1996 Runcot

Marcarini - 2004 Brunate, 1996 Brunate; 1990 Brunate; 1978 Brunate

Massolino - 2004 Vigna Rionda; 1996 Vigna Rionda Riserva “X Anni”; 1989 Vigna Rionda; 1978 Barolo Riserva

Oddero - 2006 Brunate; 2004 Vigna Mondoca Bussia Soprana; 2001 Vigna Mondoca Bussia Soprana; 1998 Vigna Rionda; 1978 Barolo (classic)

Prunotto - 2004 Bussia; 1996 Bussia; 1989 Barolo (classic); 1985 Bussia; 1982 Riserva Bussia; 1978 Riserva Bussia

Renato Ratti - 2008 Rocche; 2004 Rocche; 1999 Rocche Marcenasco; 1998 Rocche Marcenasco; 1990 Marcenasco; 1989 Conca


 

If you would like to read my reviews of all 41 wines as well as reviews of more than 100 Barolos from 2006, 2004 and 2001, as well as reviews of wines from other recent vintages such as the best from 2009, 2007 and 2008, please contact me, as I will be releasing a special issue of my Guide to Italian Wines. This will be published in a pdf file and will be sent to those that pay a small fee. More information can be found by emailing me (click on this link for my email).

 

You won’t want to miss this special Guide to Italian Wines, a complete guide to Barolo in general and the best wines over the past decade.

April 14, 2014 at 9:55 am 2 comments

A Sublime Barolo

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I’m in the final stages of tasting out some of the highly regarded examples of 2008 Barolo. They say it’s not work if you enjoy it, so this has most definitively NOT been work, as I love these wines! 2008 was a cooler year than 2007 and several other recent vintages in the Barolo zone, meaning the wines from 2008 are more classically styled Barolos with very good acidity and structure; these wines also have marvelous aromatics. Thus 2008 is a more Piemontese style of Barolo as opposed to the more international stylings of the wines from 2007, for example.

The Barolos from 2008 are not the most powerful wines – examples from 2006 are much weightier on the palate – but these are among the most beautifully balanced Barolos in some time; I think of the lovely qualities of the 1998 Barolos – not overly big, but seductive, attractive wines of great typicity, wines that offer a distinct sense of place.

I’ll include my tastings notes in my Guide to Italian Wines (Winter issue) soon *; for now I want to let you know about one of the finest wines of this vintage. It’s from the renowned producer Massolino in Serralunga d’Alba. I’ve loved the wines of Franco and Roberto Massolino for some time now, especially as they are traditional producers, maturing their wines in large Slavonian oak casks. I prefer Barolo made in this fashion, as it better allows the local terroir to emerge in the wines.

Almost all of their production is from vineyards in the commune of Serralunga; this includes cru bottlings of Parafada, Margheria and the sensational Vigna Rionda Riserva. Recently, the family purhased a small parcel of the Parussi vineyard in nearby Castiglione Falletto, another superb Barolo locale. The 2007 was the first release of this wine for Massolino and it too was aged in the traditional large casks. I rated that wine as my favorite of the 2007 Barolos from Massolino, noting its lovely perfumes, ideal balance, lengthy finish and precise acidity.

The newly released 2008 Parussi is even more impressive with gorgeous aromatics of currant, morel cherry, tar, dried roses and a hint of licorice; offering notable depth of fruit, this has excellent persistence, ideal acidity, beautifully integrated wood notes along with sensations of balsamic and coffee. The tannins are quite silky and the overall balance of this wine is impeccable! Again, this speaks beautifully to its source – this is not as powerful a wine as the Parafada from Massolino, which is from Serralunga – so it will peak a bit sooner, say 12-15 years instead of 15-20 for the latter, but it is as accomplished and as harmonious a Barolo as Massolino produced in 2008 or from 2007, for that matter! This is an outstanding Barolo!

* – For information on a paid subscription to my Guide to Italian Wines, a quarterly publication, email me at thomas2022@comcast.net

December 14, 2012 at 12:11 pm Leave a comment

Best Italian Red Wines of the Year – Part One

Pietro Ratti, Proprietor, Renato Ratti, Annunziata, La Morra (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Continuing with my lists of the Best Italian Wines of 2011, here is the initial post of red wines, focusing on Piemonte and Veneto. In the next two posts, I will write about last year’s top reds from Toscana, Campania, Puglia, Sicilia and several other regions. Please note that this is a partial list – there are other wines that made the list (see end of post for more information).

2007 Renato Ratti Barolo “Conca”

2007 Renato Ratti Barolo “Rocche”

The Renato Ratti winery is one of the most revered in all of Barolo, a benchmark estate named for one of the 20th century’s most influential vintners in this area. Renato’s son Pietro now manages the estate, continuing production of some of the finest Barolos from anywhere in the zone. From the excellent 2007 vintage, there are two single vineyard versions of Barolo that were among the best of the year: the Conca and the Rocche. Both are from sites in La Morra, not far from the winery; both are deep in color with excellent depth of fruit and impressive richness on the palate. The Conca, displaying aromas of black plum, tar and licorice is a bit more forward than the Rocche, which is more classically oriented. Both wines are quite elegant with very good acidity and are structured for 20-25 years of cellaring, with the Rocche probably outliving the Conca by a few more years. The wines at Renato Ratti have been routinely outstanding over the past half-decade – bravo, Pietro! $80

2007 Paolo Manzone Barolo “Meriame” - Serralunga d’Alba is home to perhaps the most classically structured examples of Barolo, wines that are structured for the long haul. There are so many outstanding wines from this commune every year; this was one of my absolute favorites from 2007. Produced from grapes sourced from a 60-year old vineyard, the wine offers beautiful aromas of  bing cherry, orange zest and cedar and has balanced tannins and subtle wood notes along with excellent persistence in the finish. An excellent example of Serralunga terroir, this should peak in 15-20 years. $70

2007 Pio Cesare Barolo “Ornato” - Here is another outstanding example of Serralunga terroir. Pio Cesare, one of Barolo’s most historic producers, sources the grapes for this wine from this beautiful sloping vineyard in Serralunga and ages the wines in a combination of barriques and mid-size casks. Deeply colored with an impressive mid-palate as well as excellent persistence in the finish, this is a powerful Barolo that stands the test of time. This will offer much greater complexity in another 5-7 years and should drink well for 25-30 years from now. The finest Ornato since 2001. $100

2007 Massolino Barolo “Parussi” - For many years, Massolino has been one of the reference points for Barolo from the Serralunga commune. For 2007, the Massolino family produced their first single vineyard Barolo from outside Serralunga, this being the Parussi bottling from the cru in Castiglione Falletto. Beautiful young garnet with aromas of candied orange zest, caraway and cedar, this has a lengthy, well-defined mid palate and a beautifully structured finish with youthful tannins and balanced acidity. There is also a subtle spiciness to this wine and as usual with a Massolino Barolo, the wood influence is minimal. Beautiful complexity and first-rare winemaking in this Barolo, a lovely representation of Castiglione Falletto terrior. This should be at its best in 20 years and will be in fine shape for a few years after that. $85

2007 Fratelli Alessandria Barolo “Monvigliero” - Here is a lovely Barolo from the tiny commune of Verduno, situated at the far nothern reaches of the Barolo zone. This vineyard, at an elevation of almost 1200 feet has south and southwest-facing vines that are 30 years old, resulting in a wine of impressive richness. Aged in a combination of tonneaux and mid-size Slavnonian oak casks, this is an elegantly-styled Barolo that combines richness with finesse. This is a lovely wine that is a beautiful expression of terroir; it should be at its best in 15-20 years and will probably drink well after that. $65

2008 Cascina delle Rose Barbaresco “Rio Sordo”

2008 Cascina delle Rose Barbaresco “Tre Stelle”

This tiny producer in the town of Barbaresco makes some of the very finest examples of Barbaresco. The winery is situated amidst the vines of Rio Sordo; owners Italo Sobrino and Giovanna Rizzolio own a small portion of this great site. Production here is traditional, as aging is done solely in large oak casks (grandi botti), which lends not only a strong sense of the vineyard’s terroir, but also a great deal of finesse. The aromas are lovely – red cherry, orange peel sandalwood and cedar – and there is excellent persistence and a long, graceful finish. These wines will be at their best in 12-15 years. (note” Tre Stelle” is actually a new cru located within Rio Sordo. This is the only winery to use this designation for their wine.) $50

2008 Barbaresco Pertinace “Vigneto Nervo” - While most producers of Barbaresco and Barolo are private firms, Pertinace is a cooperative producer, where the various growers are also members. This is generally the finest Barbaresco from this company, with grapes coming from a cru in Treiso. Displaying currant and orange peel aromas with a hint of fig, this is an elegant, beautifully complex Barbaresco that is an excellent representation of local terroir. This wine will be at its best in 12-15 years and is a great example of what this underrated producer is all about. $45

2008 Ceretto Barbaresco “Bricco Asili” - Here is the flagship Barbaresco from one of the zone’s most celebrated producers. This cru, planted in 1969, delivers grapes of tremendous concentration and character; naturally yields are quite low. 2008 was a true Piemontese vintage, meaning that the wines from this year are more classically structured for cellaring, more so than a warmer year such as 2007 or 2000. Aged in small oak barrels (larger than barriques) the wine has aromas of bing cherry, dried rose petals and vanilla; the concentration is quite impressive and the finish is very long with polished tannins. This is a sublime wine, meant to be enjoyed down the road – it’s impressive now, but wait another 5 or 7 years and if you have the patience, try it at peak in 15-20 years. A great Barbaresco! (and only 500 cases produced.) $75

2006 Begali Amarone della Valpolicella Classico “Monte Ca’Bianca”- Here is a real gem of a producer, one that delivers the highest quality with all of its wines. Their regular Amarone is quite complex and very nicely balanced; this cru bottling takes things up a notch or two, especially in terms of concentration. Black raspberry, black plum, clove and tar aromas grace this wine and the mid-palate is rich and nicely developed while there is excellent persistence and graceful tannins. Wonderful complexity with this wine- this is approachable now, but will be at its best in 12-15 years. $75

2005 Zenato Amarone della Valpolicella Classico Riserva - Zenato has been producing superb versions of Amarone for some time now, but without the press you’d expect. Perhaps this 2005 Riserva – from a very good, but not great year, will change that. Deep ruby red with inviting aromas of tar, stewed cherries, damson plum and tobacco, this is a marvelously complex Amarone with layers of fruit on the palate and a long, elegant finish. This is delicious now and will only improve for the next 12-15 years. Very classy and stylish! $100

2004 Masi Amarone della Valpolicella Classico “Mazzano” - Masi, one of the leading producers of Amarone, produces several versions of this iconic red wine, ranging from a regular bottling and a riserva bottling (both of which offer excellent complexity and beautiful balance) to cru bottlings from older vineyards in the Classico zone. The Mazzano bottling from a spectacularly situated, terraced vineyard, some 1300 feet above the valley floor in Negrar, is a powerful Amarone with a strong note of bitter chocolate to go along with aromas of red cherry, tar and violets. There is outstanding persistence with very good acidity and firm tannins. This should be at its best in 15-20 years, though it may drink well for another decade after that. (Note: if you cannot find the 2004 Mazzano, look for the 2001, which is an outstanding wine and will age for another 20 years.) $140

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This is a partial list of the best Italian red wines of the year. The complete list will be in the Spring issue of my Guide to Italian Wines, which will be sent to paid subscribers. If you are interested in subscribing to my publication – currently in its 11th year – email me at thomas2022@comcast.net.

January 17, 2012 at 6:54 pm 2 comments

2007 Barolo – Initial Thoughts on an impressive vintage

Paolo Manzone (with his wife Luisella) produced one of the top Barolos of 2007 (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I have just returned from a 10-day trip to the Langhe in Piemonte where I was able to taste soon-to-be released bottlings of three wine types produced entirely from the Nebbiolo grape: Roero Rosso (the new bottlings from 2008), Barbaresco (2008) and Barolo (2007). This was the Nebbiolo Prima event in Alba, organized for several dozen journalists (as well as some retailers) from around the world. I wrote about 2008 Barbaresco last time out – in this post, I will deal with 2007 Barolo.

First and foremost, this is a very good to excellent vintage, but not one I think can be defined as great. 2007 was a warm year to be sure and the wines have impressive ripeness and very good acidity. The wines are balanced and in some cases, quite approachable now, a trait not seen in the 2006 Barolos. However, that year’s Barolos displayed much deeper concentration along with more firm tannins; the 2006 Barolos are wines for 10-15 years down the road, with many of them peaking in 20-30 years. While there are a few bottlings of 2007 Barolo that will drink well at 25 years of age (such as Pio Cesare “Ornato” and the Renato Ratti “Rocche”), I believe most of these wines will peak at 15-20 years of age, which is for the most part, a typical timeframe for a very good Barolo vintage.

So while 2007 is not a great vintage, it is most certainly an appealing one. Several producers told me that they expect these wines to sell very well, as they have such forward fruit as well as round, elegant tannins. This is the thing to remember about the quality and characteristic of this vintage; unlike 2006 which needs time, these wines can be enjoyed in the near term. This is important, as there are many wine drinkers who are curious about Barolo, especially this particular vintage, which will no doubt receive very good press. 2006 may be a more classic Piemontese vintage (and one I think is outstanding), but for many wine lovers who do not drink Barolo on a regular basis – or for those interested in discovering Barolo for the first time – 2007 is a vintage that will offer ample pleasure.

Vineyards at Verduno (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

As for the individual communes themselves, Verduno performed brilliantly. This is not one of the larger communes of the Barolo zone, but the quality of wines from this small area was remarkably high. There were five wines in the tasting from Verduno and I awarded three of them a 4-star (excellent) rating with one wine receiving three stars (very good) and one wine – the Fratelli Alessandria “Monvigliero”- receiving my top rating of five stars – outstanding. This wine has lovely perfumes – my notes refer to orange pekoe tea, strawberry jam and cedar – and there is beautiful depth of fruit with ideal sturcture. This is a wine that should be at its peak in 20 years – or perhaps longer. The wines from Verduno are not the most powerful of the Barolos, but they are among the most seductive. The producers here, such as Burlotto and Castello di Verduno have been performing at a high level for years, so it’s nice to see their success in 2007.

The commune of La Morra is home to a higher percentage of Barolo vineyards than any other, so naturally there were many bottlings offered at this event. To no surprise, the wines of Renato Ratti were among the very best, especially the “Conca” and “Rocche” bottlings. Both wines offer marvelous aromas of red cherry, orange peel and plum with nicely integrated wood notes backed by an impressive mid-palate. These wines are almost as deeply concentrated as their 2006 counterparts – not quite, but almost – and offer beautiful acidity. These are built for the long haul – I marked down “25 years plus” for the Conca and “30 years” for the Rocche. Pietro Ratti has done a marvelous job following in his father’s footsteps and has been producing some of the finest and most consistent Barolos of the past decade; these bottlings from 2007 are further evidence.


Detail of Sorano Vineyard of Ascheri (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Another producer that delivered beautiful Barolos in 2007 is Ascheri; there are two wines from the Sorano vineyard in Serralunga d’Alba: the regular Sorano bottling and the Sorano “Coste e Bricco” offering. The former is more traditionally aged while the latter is crafted in more of an international style (only slightly, thankfully), but both are subdued, elegant wines that show the balance and elegance of Barolo, especially in this vintage. Matteo Ascheri is another ultra consistent Barolo producer and it’s time more reviewers celebrated his excellent work!

The wines from Serralunga d’Alba were again routinely excellent and while the overall effect was not as brilliant as 2006 from that commune, I can easily relate the quality of these wines once more. For me the two best wines were in different styles. The Paolo Manzone “Meriame” from 60-year old vines, is a classic Serralunga Barolo with a great mix of red fruit and spice aromas and a rich, tannic finish. It is quite complex and has beautifully balanced tannins and a generous mid-palate. Everything you would want in a young Barolo is in this bottling; I also tasted the 1999 Meriame at the winery before the tasting and had a similar rating. This is an outstanding vineyard and Paolo Manzone has been producing one of the most underrated Barolos for some time now. Bravo, Paolo!

The Pio Cesare “Ornato” is this historic firm’s flagship Barolo and boy, did they ever deliver in 2007. This is more of an international style, as the wine is aged in French barriques, but with the 2007 bottling, there is more than sufficient depth of fruit to balance the wood influence. There is also beautiful acidity along with great complexity and the wine is a beautiful expression of its site (the vineyard is next to the Falletto cru of Bruno Giacosa- this is clearly the high rent district of Serralunga). The wine is a bit of a monster, but I say that as a compliment, as it is a monster that has been tamed. This is my favorite Ornato since the 2001 vintage; look for this wine to be at its best in 25 years and it should drink well for several years beyond that.

Finally a few notes on some of my favorite wines from the three days of tastings. The Cogno “Ravera” is as elegant and as lovely as ever – the wines features beautiful cherry and strawberry fruit and subtle wood notes and will be at its best in 12-15 years. The Massolino “Parussi” is this estate’s first Barolo ever from Castiglione Falletto; with its orange zest and caraway aromas (typical of this commune) and its long, well-defined mid-palate, this was my favorite of this firm’s 2007 Barolos. (Massolino has also just released the Tenth Anniversary bottling of 2001 Vigna Rionda Barolo – the wine is a stunning success! It is quite simply a classic Barolo that will drink well for decades.)

Also the Elio Grasso “Gavarini Chiniera” and the “Ginestra Casa Maté” are beautiful expressions of Monteforte d’Alba terroir. These wines have excellent depth of fruit (though lighter than the outstanding 2006 offerings) and as they are aged in botti grandi, have very subtle wood influence, a quality that was not common among the Monteforte Barolos of 2007, I’m sorry to say. (I should note that the Monteforte Barolos from Giovanni Manzone (“Gramolere”) and the Giacomo Fenocchio “Bussia” were also lovely wines made in a traditional style.)

A pleasant surprise this year from Ceretto, as my favorite Barolo of theirs was the “Brunate”, which though lighter than the “Prapo” and the “Bricco Rocche”, was a bit more seductive and appealing at present. The other wines are excellent and may shine brighter in 12-15 years, but for now the Brunate is an unqualified success.

The last notes in this post are on one of my favorite producers, Francesco Rinaldi of Barolo. I visited the cellar for the first time this trip and I honestly thought I had traveled 150 years back in time – I’d never seen a cellar that old. No matter, the Barolos from this great firm have been of exceptional quality for quite some time now. This is an ultra traditional estate – the wines are aged in large Slavonian oak, which allows the Nebbiolo fruit to emerge. The first thing you note about these wines is the delicate color – pale garnet – which is in my mind, what a young Barolo should look like. The red cherry and wild strawberry fruit of the two Barolos – “Le Brunate” and “Cannubbio” - are marvelously seductive and the wines have remarkable finesse and subtlety. These are Barolos as you might have tasted 40 or 50 years ago – these are not old-fashioned wines, but ones that are classic. Congratulations to the Rinaldi family for such timeless work!

P.S. I will have full tasting notes on more than 100 of the 2007 Barolos as well as 50 of the 2008 Barbaresco in a special issue of my Guide to Italian Wines, which will be published soon. Regular subscribers to my Guide will receive this as part of their subscription. Others who want only this issue can acquire it for $10. You can email me (click on the “about me” tag of this blog) for information.

May 17, 2011 at 7:11 am Leave a comment

New Reds from Piemonte – Maintaining Heritage

Vineyards below the town of La Morra (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I’ve just returned from Piemonte, tasting new releases of Barbaresco (2007) and Barolo (2006). I briefly wrote about these wines on my other blog (read here and here). Now I would like to go into a bit more depth on Piemontese reds in general.

The Langhe area of southern Piemonte where the Barolo and Barbaresco zones are located, has been on a bit of a roll as of late. After the rainy 2002 vintage and the torridly hot 2003 growing season, which resulted in wines that were powerful, yet poorly balanced, the weather has cooperated. 2004 was a glorious year, producing wines of superb aromatics along with impressive weight. While 2005 was a lighter vintage, the wines are beautifully balanced with precise acidity and are drinking well. 2006 was a big year – this is a vintage where the wines need plenty of time – and 2007 was a relatively warm year that resulted in ripe, forward wines that are very enjoyable in their youth. The 2007 reds – at least what I have tasted so far (dozens of Barbaresco along with a handful of Barolo from cask) are notable wines, though probably not meant for the long haul, especially when compared to 2006.

Then there are the vintages of 2008 and 2009. You will be reading a great deal about the quality of 2009 in Piemonte (as well as the rest of Italy). It was a warm year, producing rich wines with impressive concentration; based on what I’ve tried so far with the whites as well as some reds from tank and cask, it definitely has the potential to be an outstanding vintage. That means that 2008 will likely be lost in the shuffle, as this was a cooler year that yielded less weighty wines.

However, 2008 is an excellent vintage – don’t let the hype fool you. While the wines may be less robust than those from 2009, they do offer beautiful varietal character and, most importantly, excellent acidity, which means the wines will age gracefully.

In fact, when it comes to Barolo and Barbaresco – both made exclusively from Nebbiolo – 2008 may be the better year. Danilo Drocco, winemaker at Fontanafredda in Serralunga d’Alba in the heart of the Barolo zone, told me that he believes 2008 will be the better of the two years for Nebbiolo-based wines. “I prefer 2008 for Nebbiolo,” Drocco related. “2008 was a long, cool growing season while 2009 was a shorter, hotter year. 2009 will be better for Barbera and Dolcetto, but it was not great for Nebbiolo.” Dante Scaglione, former winemaker at Bruno Giacosa and now consulting enologist for several projects including Cascina Roccalini in Barbaresco, told me that he agrees with Drocco about Nebbiolo for 2008.

Franco Massolino, Az. Agr. Massolino, Serralunga (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Vintage assessments are always fascinating, but it’s also important to think about the style of the red wines made in Piemonte. From what I tasted during my recent trip, it was clearly noticeable that oak is becoming more of supporting player in the wine, as it should have been all along. Barolo went through its stage of high percentage, new barrique aging during the 1990s and early 2000s, but now the tide is turning back to larger barrels and thus, less wood influence. Another promising trend is that here are more and more cellars fermenting and/or aging their wines for a short time in cement tanks. Franco Massolino in Serralunga prefers fermenting his Barolo in cement, as “this helps preserve the aromas.” How nice that producers such as Massolino, Giovanni Rosso, Elio Grasso, Marcarini, Bartolo Mascarello and others are producing wine with the goal of emphasizing the flavors of the Nebbiolo variety as well as focusing on terroir to produce a wine with a sense of place.

There are so many wonderful reds that will be released over the next 3-4 years from Piemonte and while things look good in the short term of this span, it’s especially nice that tradition will play a more important role in this area for years to come.

May 25, 2010 at 9:12 am 1 comment

Best Barolos

Renato Ratti Winery, Annunziata (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Renato Ratti Winery, Annunziata (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

A few months ago, I assembled the choices of several Italian wine authorities regarding Brunello di Montalcino. Today, we turn our attention to Barolo. (more…)

November 3, 2009 at 3:18 pm Leave a comment


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