Posts tagged ‘mariacristina oddero’

The Best Barolo You’ve Probably Never Tried

barolo_bussia_soprana_oddero

If you’re a lover of Barolo, you are certainly familiar with great cru offerings from some of the most celebrated producers; these include wines such as Briccco Rocche from Ceretto, Bricco Boschis from Cavallotto, Rocche from Renato Ratti or any one of several from Roberto Voerzio (Brunate, Cerequio, La Serra, et al). There are dozens of other great cru Barolos from many other renowned estates, but one I’m certain most people haven’t heard of is the Bussia Soprana “Vigna Mondoca”  from Oddero.

Located in Santa Maria, a frazione of La Morra, in the heart of the Barolo zone, this distinguished family firm under the direction of Mariacristina and Mariavittoria Oddero has quietly become one of the most consistent and most highly regarded of all Barolo houses. The quality level is routinely excellent and has been steadily improving for the past decade.

Oddero produces as many as six different examples of Barolo per year, including one blended from La Morra and Castiglione grapes along with several cru bottlings, including Villero from Castiglione Falletto, Vigna Rionda from Serralunga d’Alba and Rocche di Castiglione from Castiglione Falletto. These vineyards are quite famous; other producers also craft single vineyard wines from these sites.

But  it is the Bussia Soprana “Vigna Mondoca” that may just be the finest Barolo produced by Oddero, although it is nowhere as famous as their other wines. The vineyard itself is quite unique, comprised of white/grey marls and yellow sands with more limestone than clay. At the top of the hill (1180 feet above sea level), the soils are almost completely white, leading Mariacristina Oddero to comment that  it looks “like lunar soil.”

Maria Cristina Oddero

Mariacristina Oddero (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Oddero acquired their section of this vineyard in 1970 and has never replanted, so the vines are at least 40-45 years old. Typical of a Barolo from the commune of Monforte d’Alba, this is a wine with firm, abundant tannins, so much so that the proprietors have made the decision to hold on to this wine one extra year before releasing it in the market. So while the current release of the other Barolos from Oddero, such as Villero, is 2008 (these were released a few months ago in 2012), the new release for the “Vigna Mondoca” is the 2007 – the 2008 will not be released until the fall of 2013.

I’ve recently tasted the 2007 and 2006 versions of this wine and I rated both as 5-star (outstanding) wines. The 2007 is much more intense and powerful than the typical 2007 Barolo, as this vintage produced many forward wines with medium-weight tannins. But the Oddero “Vigna Mondoca” from 2007 is a wine that needs a lot of time to shed its youthful tannins and settle down; in my notes, I have estimated that peak drinking for this wine will be in 20-25 years.

As for the 2006, this wine really displays its breeding and class along with the intensity and rich concentration of that wonderful vintage. Offering marvelous aromas of currant, dried cherry, balsamic, orange peel and cedar, this is a tightly wrapped wine that is an superb representation of this site;  it is intense, yet beautifully balanced, so the wine should be in excellent condition when it peaks in 25-20 years.

The proprietors mature this wine each vintage in 40, 60 and 75 hectoliter (4000, 6000 and 7500 liter) Slavonian and Austrian oak casks for 30 months; this allows for beautiful expression of terroir, as the large casks let the Nebbiolo fruit characteristics emerge without being overwhelmed by too many wood notes. This gives the wine a unique identity, something that is a shared trait with other great examples of Barolo or many other superb red wines of Italy and the rest of the world.

Compliments to the Oddero family on such a superb wine each vintage. As with anything that is truly great, this is not easy to find (only about 30,000 bottles are produced in a year), but the search will undeniably be worth it!

January 24, 2013 at 10:53 am Leave a comment

Vigna Rionda – a great cru in Serralunga

Bottle of Massolino Vigna Rionda Barolo (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

During my most recent visit to Piemonte, there was a lot of excitement about one particular Barolo cru, that of Vigna Rionda in Serralunga d’Alba. One of the owners recently passed away and the section he possessed is being divided up among three wineries, all of whom will produce a Vigna Rionda Barolo for the first time.

This is newsworthy because of the historical importance of the Vigna Rionda cru. Literally meaning “round vineyard”,  Vigna Rionda is sited on a slope at elevations ranging from 820 to 1180 feet above sea level; the beneficial siting of this hill insures a great deal of sun throughout the day. The soils are a combination of marl, calcaire and a touch of sand; the vineyard is sheltered from excessive winds by the nearby Castelleto hill. In his beautifully detailed map of the vineyards and cellars of Serralunga, Alessandro Masnaghetti writes these words of acclaim for the quality of this vineyard:

“Vigna Rionda, in the collective imagination of many wine lovers, has become synonymous with the Barolo of Serralunga d’Alba… the Barolo which is produced here can be termed – even more than a Barolo of Serralunga – a Barolo of Vigna Rionda, such is the imprint of the cru on this wine.”

When you consider the number of remarkable Barolo crus in Serralunga, such as Ornato, Falletto, Lazzarito, Prapo and La Rosa, this is high praise for the distinctive style that emerges from Vigna Rionda. Thus the excitement over the new wines down the road.

Regarding the change in ownership of a small (2.2 hectare) section of Vigna Rionda, the details have to do with the passing away of Tommaso Canale, whose ancestors had purchased this plot back in the mid-1930s. Tommaso died in December, so now his section of Vigna Rionda will be turned over to three producers, who are relatives: Guido Porro, Ettore Germano and Giovanni Rosso. In the case of the Rosso estate, this is wonderful and appropriate news, as current proprietor and winemaker Davide Rosso (his father Giovanni passed away only recently) is the son of Ester Canale Rosso, who once owned this section along with her mother Cristina (due to financial difficulties back then, they were forced to sell to a family member).

Davide Rosso (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

What all this means is that some producers who worked with this fruit will no longer produce a Vigna Rionda Barolo – Roagna is perhaps the best known firm in this instance. But Porro, Rosso and Germano will be producing a Vigna Rionda Barolo down the road. Sergio Germano told me in an email that he will probably produce his first Barolo from this site from the 2017 vintage, while for Rosso, his first bottling will be from this vintage, the 2011, though in small quantities. (I do not have the information on when the initial Porro bottling will be produced.) Much of this section contains vines that are 60-years old and while some of these vines are in wonderful condition, others need to be replanted.

Mariacristina Oddero (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

One thing that needs to be noted is that the transfer of this section of Vigna Rionda is limited to a small section of this cru. There are indeed other owners of Vigna Rionda, who will continue to produce a Barolo from this vineyard. Among the most notable is the Oddero estate of Santa Maria (La Morra); Mariacristina Oddero notes that their family purchased one hectare in 1982. To be exact, they own parcels 335, 340, 338 and 337 of plot number 8 (the Rosso section is parcel 251P of plot number 8). The have been producing Vigna Rionda Barolo for many years and will continue to do so.

Also, the largest single owner of Vigna Rionda is the Massolino family of Serralunga, who owns 2.3 hectares (parcels 79-80-81-82-84-85-86 of plot number 8, to be exact.). Massolino produces a Riserva Barolo from Vigna Rionda fruit, which is one of the most complex, complete and most powerful Barolos of Serrallunga. It also has great cellaring potential – often as long as 40 years – and is one of the most authentic representations of this great vineyard.

Thanks very much to Sergio Germano, Davide Rosso, Franco Massolino, Mariacristina Oddero and Alessandro Masnaghetti for their assistance reagrding this topic.

May 24, 2011 at 2:00 pm Leave a comment


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