Posts tagged ‘castiglione falletto’

A Sublime Barolo

massolino-parussi-barolo-docg-italy-10353751

I’m in the final stages of tasting out some of the highly regarded examples of 2008 Barolo. They say it’s not work if you enjoy it, so this has most definitively NOT been work, as I love these wines! 2008 was a cooler year than 2007 and several other recent vintages in the Barolo zone, meaning the wines from 2008 are more classically styled Barolos with very good acidity and structure; these wines also have marvelous aromatics. Thus 2008 is a more Piemontese style of Barolo as opposed to the more international stylings of the wines from 2007, for example.

The Barolos from 2008 are not the most powerful wines – examples from 2006 are much weightier on the palate – but these are among the most beautifully balanced Barolos in some time; I think of the lovely qualities of the 1998 Barolos – not overly big, but seductive, attractive wines of great typicity, wines that offer a distinct sense of place.

I’ll include my tastings notes in my Guide to Italian Wines (Winter issue) soon *; for now I want to let you know about one of the finest wines of this vintage. It’s from the renowned producer Massolino in Serralunga d’Alba. I’ve loved the wines of Franco and Roberto Massolino for some time now, especially as they are traditional producers, maturing their wines in large Slavonian oak casks. I prefer Barolo made in this fashion, as it better allows the local terroir to emerge in the wines.

Almost all of their production is from vineyards in the commune of Serralunga; this includes cru bottlings of Parafada, Margheria and the sensational Vigna Rionda Riserva. Recently, the family purhased a small parcel of the Parussi vineyard in nearby Castiglione Falletto, another superb Barolo locale. The 2007 was the first release of this wine for Massolino and it too was aged in the traditional large casks. I rated that wine as my favorite of the 2007 Barolos from Massolino, noting its lovely perfumes, ideal balance, lengthy finish and precise acidity.

The newly released 2008 Parussi is even more impressive with gorgeous aromatics of currant, morel cherry, tar, dried roses and a hint of licorice; offering notable depth of fruit, this has excellent persistence, ideal acidity, beautifully integrated wood notes along with sensations of balsamic and coffee. The tannins are quite silky and the overall balance of this wine is impeccable! Again, this speaks beautifully to its source – this is not as powerful a wine as the Parafada from Massolino, which is from Serralunga – so it will peak a bit sooner, say 12-15 years instead of 15-20 for the latter, but it is as accomplished and as harmonious a Barolo as Massolino produced in 2008 or from 2007, for that matter! This is an outstanding Barolo!

* – For information on a paid subscription to my Guide to Italian Wines, a quarterly publication, email me at thomas2022@comcast.net

December 14, 2012 at 12:11 pm Leave a comment

The Soul of Vietti

Luciana Currado, Vietti (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I had the pleasure of dining with Luciana Currado of the great Piemontese estate Vietti in Chicago yesterday. Currado was in town to taste out a number of wines, most importantly the brand new release of Barolo Villero Riserva 2004.

I’ve known Luciana and her son Luca, who serves as winemaker, for more than a decade. Both of them are hard working, down to earth people, who are very gracious and always willing to listen to what you have to say. Luciana has been at the forefront of promoting Vietti wines; this responsibility has become a larger part of her life since her beloved husband Alfredo passed away last year after a long illness. While Luciana misses her husband, she clearly brings a lot of energy and passion to her job, as she talks of the history of her estate.

We started off the tasting with two bottlings of Barbera: one, the 2007 La Crena, is from Asti, while the other, the 2009 Scarrone Vigna Vecchia, is a Barbera d’Alba (this vineyard is at the Vietti estate in Castiglione Falletto). While both are modern interpretations of Barbera- that is to say, very ripe with slightly lower acidity and more small oak aging – these are beautifully balanced wines (unlike too many examples of Barbera today that are overly ripe, “serious” wines). The La Crena has beautiful black fruit along with a hint of mocha and excellent persistence; forward and quite tasty, this will be at its best in 5-7 years.

The Scarrone is from a vineyard at the Vietti estate in the commune of Castiglione Falletto. There are two bottlings: a regular and this, the Vigna Vecchia (old vines), from vines that are now more than 90 years old. Although not as deep in color as the La Crena (deep ruby red/purple on the Scarrone versus deep, bright purple on the La Crena), this is a richer, riper, more sumptuous wine in every way. With boysenberry and plum fruit and outstanding persistence, this is a great success. 2009 was a warm vintage, which aided ripeness and helped keep the natural acidity down; Luca Currado plays this up, but the wine is in perfect balance with every component in harmony. This is a delicious, hedonistic, decadent style of Barbera that is a long way from traditional Barbera and a wine that has to be tasted to be believed!

Next were the 2007 Castiglione Barolo and the 2006 Masseria Barbaresco. The Castiglione Barolo is a blend of Nebbiolo grapes from several communes and is a nice introduction to Vietti Barolo, with its varietal purity and distinctive spice. As for Barbaresco, here is a wine few talk about when referring to Vietti; that is a shame, as this is a lovely wine, very underrated. With beautiful aromas of persimmon (I find this to be a trademark aroma for Nebbiolo in the Barbaresco area) and dried cherry and expressive spice notes in the finish (cumin, oregano and thyme) along with excellent persistence and acidity, this is a notable wine. 2006 was a classic Piemontese vintage, that is to say, one in which the finest wines offer beautiful structure, impressive concentration and outstanding complexity- these are wines that are not as forward as in some years, but with patience – 12-15 years for this wine, in my opinion – they will display their finest traits.

Then came the showcase wines – three vintages of Villero Riserva Barolo. Villero is a single vineyard in Castiglione Falletto and in most years, Luca Currado uses the grapes from this site as part of the cuvée of his Castiglione Barolo. But in truly exceptional years – he will bottle this wine separately. We tasted three vintages, the newly released 2004 along with the 2001 and 1996; in tasting these wines the character of this vineyard, its outstanding fruit and the precision winemaking of Currado were all clearly on display.

The 2004 displayed the beautiful perfumes and ideal acidity of that vintage; red cherry and currant fruit are featured in the aromas and the wine has excellent persistence and complexity along with a beautiful sense of place. Look for this deeply concentrated wine to be at is best in 20-25 years- perhaps longer. (The playful label reminds one that 2004 was the year of the rabbit.)

The 2001, from an amazing Barolo vintage, is a huge wine of great power and intensity. Here the aromas are of cherry and black plum and there is outstanding depth of fruit and complexity. This is a wine of great persistence and structure; my best guess is that this wine will peak in 25-40 years! This is a great bottle of Barolo!

The 1996, from a truly great Barolo vintage, offers a bit more subtlety now, which is no surprise as the wine is a few years older. The aromas are of red currant and strawberry preserves (heavenly!) and there is a bit more spice on display in the finish (cumin, oregano and cinnamon). The tannins are big, but beautifully balanced, the acidity is perfect and the persistence is quite impressive; look for this wine to peak in 25-30 years, although it will probably drink well for a few years after that.

These three vintages all offer a beautiful sense of the terroir of Villero and are packed with layers of fruit. The complexity on all three wines is impressive; each is an outstanding wine, a testament to the life’s work of the Currado family. Not only was it a rare treat to try three vintages of the Villero Barolo at one sitting, but how wonderful to enjoy these wines along with Luciana Currado!

The tasting/lunch was held at the Balsan Restaurant at the Elysian Hotel in Chicago, a property that has only been open a little more than two years. The space is quite handsome and cozy and the food was excellent. For the Barolos, we were offered the option of a rib-eye steak or rainbow trout; as I don’t eat red meat, I opted for the latter. While I have enjoyed fish a few times with Barolo (only a few), I would have never thought of trout as an accompaniment, but it was perfect here, served with goat cheese and arugula. It had enough texture and flavor to stand up to the Barolo and captured the earthiness of the wines quite well. Bravo to the chef!

September 16, 2011 at 12:06 pm 4 comments

2007 Barolo – Initial Thoughts on an impressive vintage

Paolo Manzone (with his wife Luisella) produced one of the top Barolos of 2007 (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I have just returned from a 10-day trip to the Langhe in Piemonte where I was able to taste soon-to-be released bottlings of three wine types produced entirely from the Nebbiolo grape: Roero Rosso (the new bottlings from 2008), Barbaresco (2008) and Barolo (2007). This was the Nebbiolo Prima event in Alba, organized for several dozen journalists (as well as some retailers) from around the world. I wrote about 2008 Barbaresco last time out – in this post, I will deal with 2007 Barolo.

First and foremost, this is a very good to excellent vintage, but not one I think can be defined as great. 2007 was a warm year to be sure and the wines have impressive ripeness and very good acidity. The wines are balanced and in some cases, quite approachable now, a trait not seen in the 2006 Barolos. However, that year’s Barolos displayed much deeper concentration along with more firm tannins; the 2006 Barolos are wines for 10-15 years down the road, with many of them peaking in 20-30 years. While there are a few bottlings of 2007 Barolo that will drink well at 25 years of age (such as Pio Cesare “Ornato” and the Renato Ratti “Rocche”), I believe most of these wines will peak at 15-20 years of age, which is for the most part, a typical timeframe for a very good Barolo vintage.

So while 2007 is not a great vintage, it is most certainly an appealing one. Several producers told me that they expect these wines to sell very well, as they have such forward fruit as well as round, elegant tannins. This is the thing to remember about the quality and characteristic of this vintage; unlike 2006 which needs time, these wines can be enjoyed in the near term. This is important, as there are many wine drinkers who are curious about Barolo, especially this particular vintage, which will no doubt receive very good press. 2006 may be a more classic Piemontese vintage (and one I think is outstanding), but for many wine lovers who do not drink Barolo on a regular basis – or for those interested in discovering Barolo for the first time – 2007 is a vintage that will offer ample pleasure.

Vineyards at Verduno (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

As for the individual communes themselves, Verduno performed brilliantly. This is not one of the larger communes of the Barolo zone, but the quality of wines from this small area was remarkably high. There were five wines in the tasting from Verduno and I awarded three of them a 4-star (excellent) rating with one wine receiving three stars (very good) and one wine – the Fratelli Alessandria “Monvigliero”- receiving my top rating of five stars – outstanding. This wine has lovely perfumes – my notes refer to orange pekoe tea, strawberry jam and cedar – and there is beautiful depth of fruit with ideal sturcture. This is a wine that should be at its peak in 20 years – or perhaps longer. The wines from Verduno are not the most powerful of the Barolos, but they are among the most seductive. The producers here, such as Burlotto and Castello di Verduno have been performing at a high level for years, so it’s nice to see their success in 2007.

The commune of La Morra is home to a higher percentage of Barolo vineyards than any other, so naturally there were many bottlings offered at this event. To no surprise, the wines of Renato Ratti were among the very best, especially the “Conca” and “Rocche” bottlings. Both wines offer marvelous aromas of red cherry, orange peel and plum with nicely integrated wood notes backed by an impressive mid-palate. These wines are almost as deeply concentrated as their 2006 counterparts – not quite, but almost – and offer beautiful acidity. These are built for the long haul – I marked down “25 years plus” for the Conca and “30 years” for the Rocche. Pietro Ratti has done a marvelous job following in his father’s footsteps and has been producing some of the finest and most consistent Barolos of the past decade; these bottlings from 2007 are further evidence.


Detail of Sorano Vineyard of Ascheri (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Another producer that delivered beautiful Barolos in 2007 is Ascheri; there are two wines from the Sorano vineyard in Serralunga d’Alba: the regular Sorano bottling and the Sorano “Coste e Bricco” offering. The former is more traditionally aged while the latter is crafted in more of an international style (only slightly, thankfully), but both are subdued, elegant wines that show the balance and elegance of Barolo, especially in this vintage. Matteo Ascheri is another ultra consistent Barolo producer and it’s time more reviewers celebrated his excellent work!

The wines from Serralunga d’Alba were again routinely excellent and while the overall effect was not as brilliant as 2006 from that commune, I can easily relate the quality of these wines once more. For me the two best wines were in different styles. The Paolo Manzone “Meriame” from 60-year old vines, is a classic Serralunga Barolo with a great mix of red fruit and spice aromas and a rich, tannic finish. It is quite complex and has beautifully balanced tannins and a generous mid-palate. Everything you would want in a young Barolo is in this bottling; I also tasted the 1999 Meriame at the winery before the tasting and had a similar rating. This is an outstanding vineyard and Paolo Manzone has been producing one of the most underrated Barolos for some time now. Bravo, Paolo!

The Pio Cesare “Ornato” is this historic firm’s flagship Barolo and boy, did they ever deliver in 2007. This is more of an international style, as the wine is aged in French barriques, but with the 2007 bottling, there is more than sufficient depth of fruit to balance the wood influence. There is also beautiful acidity along with great complexity and the wine is a beautiful expression of its site (the vineyard is next to the Falletto cru of Bruno Giacosa- this is clearly the high rent district of Serralunga). The wine is a bit of a monster, but I say that as a compliment, as it is a monster that has been tamed. This is my favorite Ornato since the 2001 vintage; look for this wine to be at its best in 25 years and it should drink well for several years beyond that.

Finally a few notes on some of my favorite wines from the three days of tastings. The Cogno “Ravera” is as elegant and as lovely as ever – the wines features beautiful cherry and strawberry fruit and subtle wood notes and will be at its best in 12-15 years. The Massolino “Parussi” is this estate’s first Barolo ever from Castiglione Falletto; with its orange zest and caraway aromas (typical of this commune) and its long, well-defined mid-palate, this was my favorite of this firm’s 2007 Barolos. (Massolino has also just released the Tenth Anniversary bottling of 2001 Vigna Rionda Barolo – the wine is a stunning success! It is quite simply a classic Barolo that will drink well for decades.)

Also the Elio Grasso “Gavarini Chiniera” and the “Ginestra Casa Maté” are beautiful expressions of Monteforte d’Alba terroir. These wines have excellent depth of fruit (though lighter than the outstanding 2006 offerings) and as they are aged in botti grandi, have very subtle wood influence, a quality that was not common among the Monteforte Barolos of 2007, I’m sorry to say. (I should note that the Monteforte Barolos from Giovanni Manzone (“Gramolere”) and the Giacomo Fenocchio “Bussia” were also lovely wines made in a traditional style.)

A pleasant surprise this year from Ceretto, as my favorite Barolo of theirs was the “Brunate”, which though lighter than the “Prapo” and the “Bricco Rocche”, was a bit more seductive and appealing at present. The other wines are excellent and may shine brighter in 12-15 years, but for now the Brunate is an unqualified success.

The last notes in this post are on one of my favorite producers, Francesco Rinaldi of Barolo. I visited the cellar for the first time this trip and I honestly thought I had traveled 150 years back in time – I’d never seen a cellar that old. No matter, the Barolos from this great firm have been of exceptional quality for quite some time now. This is an ultra traditional estate – the wines are aged in large Slavonian oak, which allows the Nebbiolo fruit to emerge. The first thing you note about these wines is the delicate color – pale garnet – which is in my mind, what a young Barolo should look like. The red cherry and wild strawberry fruit of the two Barolos – “Le Brunate” and “Cannubbio” - are marvelously seductive and the wines have remarkable finesse and subtlety. These are Barolos as you might have tasted 40 or 50 years ago – these are not old-fashioned wines, but ones that are classic. Congratulations to the Rinaldi family for such timeless work!

P.S. I will have full tasting notes on more than 100 of the 2007 Barolos as well as 50 of the 2008 Barbaresco in a special issue of my Guide to Italian Wines, which will be published soon. Regular subscribers to my Guide will receive this as part of their subscription. Others who want only this issue can acquire it for $10. You can email me (click on the “about me” tag of this blog) for information.

May 17, 2011 at 7:11 am Leave a comment

Cavallotto – Top 100

Here is another of my Top 100 producers in Italy.

Painting of Cavallotto bottle by Hannes HofstetterPainting of Cavallotto Bottle by Hannes Hofstetter

One of the seminal producers of Barolo is the Cavallotto family of Castiglione Falletto. Established in 1948 by Olivio Cavallotto, the operations are run today by his offspring, siblings Alfio, Giuseppe and Laura, who continue to make wines that are shining examples of terroir.

The key to their wines – as with any producer – emerges from the vineyards and the Cavallotto family’s prized site is Bricco Boschis, which sits on a hillside in Castglione Falletto, overlooking much of the Barolo zone. Several red wines are produced from this vineyard, including Grignolino, Freisa and Barbera, but the various offerings of Barolo offer the best evidence of the superior quailty of this vineyard.

Each year a regular bottling of Bricco Boschis Barolo is bottled, while in the finest vintages, a Riserva bottling, labeled Vigna San Giuseppe, is produced. Both of these Barolos, as well as the Riserva bottling from the adjacent Vignolo vineyard are excellent examples of wines that perfectly display their terroir.

A principal reason for this is the decision to only use grandi botti for aging the wines, which allows the fruit to shine through with minimal wood influence. Combine this traditional way of winemaking along with low yields on immaculately farmed sites and you have a recipe for greatness. Even a humble Piemontese red such as Grignolino is an unqualified success, as the Cavallotto bottling offers more depth of fruit and greater complexity than almost any other example of this variety.

But the Barolos from Bricco Boschis are what truly define Cavallotto as one of the greatest producers in Italy. Offering gorgeous cherry and raspberry fruit along with hints of nutmeg and cedar, the wines are quite full in the mouth; elegantly crafted tannins and pinpoint acidity give the wines a remarkable silkiness. The regular bottling of Bricco Boschis Barolo is always striking, while the Vigna San Giuseppe is even better; more deeply concentrated and structured for 20-25 years of cellaring – and in some vintages, such as the glorious 2001 – perhaps as long as 30 or 40 years. This is one of the great bottlings of Barolo and you owe it to yourself to try at least one vintage of this wine to understand what classic Barolo is all about!

One final note about these wines is that they are ideal for food. The family does not make wines to garner high ratings or please the market; rather they make wines that are perfect representations of their site. I have tasted Cavallotto Barolo with any number of dishes, be it roast duck, braised rabbit or even river trout and have been mesmerized by how well the wine works with each food. Given that the Piemontese are idealists when it comes to pairing their wines with the local cuisine, this is about as high a praise I can offer!

The best wines of Cavallotto include:

  • Grignolino (Piemonte DOC)
  • Dolcetto d’Alba “Vigna Scot”
  • Barbera d’Alba “Bricco Boschis – Vigna Cucolo”
  • Langhe Nebbiolo “Bricco Boschis”
  • Barolo “Bricco Boschis”
  • Barolo “Bricco Boschis – Vigna San Giuseppe” Riserva
  • Barolo “Vignolo” Riserva

November 23, 2009 at 11:48 am Leave a comment

Dining in Piemonte – Part One

One of the best ways to learn about Italian wines is to try them with local foods. You might be lucky enough to dine at a friend’s home when you’re in Italy, but for most of us, a trattoria, osteria or ristorante will be our dining experience. 

There are so many wonderful eateries in all of Italy, but for me the greatest number of these are concentrated in a small area of the province of Cuneo in Piemonte. This is the area that is home to the charming Dolcetto, a red wine with delicious black raspberry and cranberry fruit; the tangy Barbera with plenty of spice, high acidity and very light tannins and the regal red pairing of Barolo and Barbaresco, both made exclusively from the Nebbiolo grape. (more…)

August 26, 2009 at 2:18 pm 2 comments


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