Posts tagged ‘canalicchio di sopra’

Brunello di Montalcino – 2007 normale and 2006 Riserva


Plaque honoring the 2007 Brunello vintage in the main square of Montalcino (Photo by Tom Hyland)

2007 Brunello- Triumph of the Traditionalists

I’ve just returned from Montalcino, where I attended the annual Benvenuto Brunello event along with several dozen wine writers from around the world. This is an anteprima tasting, where wines that will be released later in the year are sampled for journalists. As Brunello di Montalcino is released on a five-year cycle, the new wines at this tasting were from 2007; the 2006 Riservas were also sampled as well as Rosso di Montalcino from 2010.

2007 was an excellent year for red wines throughout much of Italy; this was especially true in Toscana. The warm weather ensured excellent ripeness, yet there was also good natural acidity in the wines. True, this is a forward, somewhat international vintage, but the wines are well balanced and offer very good structure. Overall, I think this is an excellent vintage and while I do not rate it quite as high as 2006, which I thought outstanding, this is a year with many first-rate and several outstanding wines. (note: the Consorzio rated both 2006 and 2007 as 5-star – outstanding – years.)

As usual, I will review all the wines I tasted – more than 60 – in my Guide to Italian Wines. For now, I will discuss a few of my favorite wines, starting with the 2007 bottlings.  As usual, the wines from Poggio Antico are excellent, delivering impressive depth of fruit as well as a long, polished finish. There are two bottlings: the regular Poggio Antico as well as the “Altero”; this year, I slightly preferred the regular bottling (5 stars-outstanding) over the “Altero” but that could change with time.

Every year, I have the Eredi Fuligni at or near the top of my list; the 2007 continues that tradition. Here is a traditionally made wine with gorgeous perfumes, a generous mid-palate, very good acidity and polished tannins. The wine is clean and has remarkable varietal purity. Bravo to Fuligni for their amazing Brunello every year, a wine that is for me, a textbook Brunello.

Francesco Marone Cinzano, propirietor, Col d’Orcia (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Col d’Orcia has been one of my favorite Brunello producers for some time now and they delivered another excellent wine in 2007. Displaying lovely rose petal and tart cherry aromas with a hint of tobacco, this has lovely balance, excellent persistence and ideal acidity. Another traditional producer, Col d’Orcia crafts wines that are true expressions of terroir, a trait on display in their 2007 Brunello, a wine I think will be at peak in 12-15 years, although it will most likely be drinking well for several years after that.

Other 2007 Brunellos that I loved included the gracefully mannered Caprili; the varietally pure and exquisitely balanced Il Poggione; the exquisite Tenuta di Sesta and the always graceful Uccelliera. Propietor Andrea Cortonesi has been on quite a streak as of late, refining his Brunello to offer a wine of lovely cherry flavors, polished tannins and a wonderful sense of place. This 2007 is outstanding!

A few pleasant surprises among the 2007 Brunello included the Ridolfi and the Sassodisole. Each year there are more than 125 Brunello normale available for tasting. I have a core group of wines I try each year, but I always make sure to sample the wines from producers I’m not that familiar with for whatever reasons. One of those producers, Ridolfi made a 2007 Brunello with lovely rose petal and dried cherry aromas along with notes of thyme and cedar, elegant tannins and very good acidity; this is quite stylish. The Sassodisole, another winery whose products I had not tried before, delivered a gorgeous traditional Brunello aged for 36 months in grandi botti that displays beautiful perfumes of tart cherry, currant and strawberry preserves (!); there is very good depth of fruit, ideal acidity and excellent persistence. Here is a graceful wine that is beautifully made – a wine from a powerful vintage that is all about finesse. This is an outstanding wine and Sassodisole is a winery to keep an eye on; I know I’l be tasting their wines every chance I get.

 

 Claudio Tipa, proprietor Poggio di Sotto (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 If I had to select one 2007 Brunello di Montalcino, it would be the Poggio di Sotto. This has been one of Montalcino’s finest artisan estates since Piero Palmucci released his first wines from the 1991 vintage. Palmucci had several ideas as to how to produce outstanding Brunello, the core of which was two-fold; age only in large casks and age for a long period of time. The results over the years have been nothing short of outstanding.

Palmucci recently sold the winery to Claudio Tipa, a true Tuscan gentleman, who has been involved in the wine business for decades. Tipa is most famous as the owner of Colle Massari in southern Tuscany as well as the renowned Grattamacco estate in Bolgheri, along Tuscany’s coast. Tipa told me at the winery that he is a strong believer in what Palmucci has accomplished and will not change the style.

At the beginning of this post, I wrote that this year in Montalcino was a “triumph of the traditionalists.” You will note the number of traditional wines I have written about in this post and while I admit to a bias toward this style of wine, I could not help that even with the more modern wines, the oak influence has been reduced. What wonderful news for any wine drinker, as less oak in these wines lets the varietal character of these wines shine, while at the same time, allowing the wines to show a sense of place. Be it from Montalcino, Piemonte or Campania, all great Italian red wines share these traits.

Getting back to Poggio di Sotto, it is this subtle wood influence that helps define the local terroir of Castelnuovo dell’Abate, one of Montalcino’s best sub-zones. But it is also the length of time in grandi botti that helps refine these wines. The 2007 Poggio di Sotto Brunello stayed in wood for more than 3 and 1/2 years, far longer than the minimum two years required. What this achieves, according to winemaker Federico Staderini, is a lightness on the palate, an elegance that is largely unmatched. When I tasted this wine, I noted how weightless this wine seemed; this to me was a quality I normally only associate with older Brunellos, perhaps 12 or 15 years of age. But here was a new release that was as refined a Brunello as I have ever had at such a young age. This is something every producer should aim for, even if they may never realize the finesse and subtleties of the wines of Poggio di Sotto.

A few words on the 2006 Brunello Riserva. 2006 was an outstanding year in Montalcino with wines of great concentration and impresssive structure. The 2006s are not as forward as the 2007s (and thus may not appeal to casual red wine drinkers), but if you want to appreciate what classic Brunello is all about, this is an ideal vintage, as these wines will slowly unfold and offer their complexities over a long period of time – some 20-25 years. Among the finest 2006 Brunello Riservas were the Il PoggioneCanalicchio di SopraTalenti, Poggio Antico and of course, the Poggio di Sotto. All of these wines offered excellent depth of fruit and a fine sense of place, along with ideal balance and persistence. The Il Poggione was most impressive, as it is one of the most powerful wines I have ever tried from this great producer, yet the wine never abandons the harmonious style this winery is known for.

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My notes on the 2007 Brunello di Montalcino and 2006 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva along with notes on a few 2010 Rosso di Montalcino will be published in the Spring 2012 issue of my Guide to Italian Wines. This is a quarterly publication that carries a paid subscription of $30 a year, less than a bottle of Brunello! This spring issue will be more than 40 pages in length and will be sent out to subscribers via email. If you would like to purchase this issue separately (available around the end of March), the cost is a mere $10. For more information, email me (this information can be found here.)

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One final note: the 2007 Brunello di Montalcino now carry the new DOCG strip – quite a change from the prior pink/rose colored one.

March 1, 2012 at 10:52 am 6 comments

2004 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva

A few weeks ago in Chicago and New York, I tasted pre-release bottlings of the 2004 Brunello di Montalcino Riservas. I had looked forward to the regular bottlings of the 2004 Brunellos when they were released last year and was even more excited about these Riservas.

2004 was an excellent year throughout much of the Italian peninsula and that was true in Toscana as well. The 2004s displayed lovely fresh fruit aromas with very good to excellent concentration and nicely balanced acidity. After the alcoholic and bitter bottlings from 2003 and the lighter than normal 2002’s, the Brunellos from 2004 were a step in the right direction.

To me 2004 is a classic Brunello vintage – one that emphasized elegance over power. The wines as a whole are not as deeply concentrated as those from 2001, so they will probably not age as long as those bottlngs. For that reason, some journalists have gone on record as believing that the 2004 Brunellos were not as exciting as some were making them out to be. The bottom line for me is that everyone likes the wines very much, but it’s just a case of how much. I think overall the Brunellos from 2004 are excellent, with several outstanding bottlings.  So now the 2004 Riservas and as you can imagine, I like these wines very much. I was certainly looking forward to the “best of the best” from this year, and I have not been disappointed. The wines have very impressive concentration, beautiful varietal exprression and the structure to age for 15-20 years, perhaps longer in a few cases.

Here are some brief thoughts on a few of my favorites:

FULIGNI

I am a huge fan of this producer, one of the very best who makes his wines in a traditional style. Beautiful red cherry, strawberry and cedar notes, impressive concentration, elegant entry on the palate and a long, sensual finish with excellent fruit persistence. A classic bottling, easily one of the best Brunellos from 2004.

IL POGGIONE

Another of my very favorite producers in Montalcino, this is another producer that makes their wines in a traditional manner. Lovely perfumes, excellent concentration and a huge finish. This is a more powerful wine than the Fuligni and will require more aging to be at its best. Yet the wine always maintains its harmony and finesse. The Brunello Riserva from Il Poggione, incidentally, is now labeled as “Vigna Paganelli”; the Riserva has traditionally been sourced from this 40 year old vineyard, but it has only been labeled this way since the 2003 bottling.

Alessandro Bindoccci, Il Poggione (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

 

CAPARZO

This producer did not make a Riserva in 2002 or 2003, so this is a pleasant return. More modern than the two wines listed above, but restrained in its use of oak. Deeply concentrated with admirable ripeness, this is quite complete and should age well for 12-15 years.

MOCALI “VIGNA DELLE RAUNATE”

Lovely deep garnet color; beautiful cherry and cedar aromas. Medium-full with a lengthy finish with elegant tannins. Quite stylish!

MOCALI

The regular bottling of Brunello Riserva (if that makes any sense!), this is not as deeply concentrated as the “Rauante”, but is elegantly styled with very fine tannins and precise acidity and should be at its best in 10-12 years.

TENUTA DI SESTA

Cherry and berry fruit and cedar aromas; medium-full with elegantly styled tannins and a distinct, earthy, herbal finish with very good persistence. Some nice notes of balsamic add complexity to the flavor profile.

CANALICCHIO DI SOPRA

An underrated traditional producer, the 2004 Riserva  has plenty of fruit along with firm, youthful tannins. Earthy finish with notes of menthol and impressive persistence. Best in 12-15 years.

I will taste many more examples of both the regulat 2004 Brunellos as well as the 2004 Brunello Riservas at VinItaly this April and will report on these in future posts. Paid subscribers to my publication, Guide to Italian Wines, will be able to read my tasting notes from all of these wines. To leanrn how to subscribe, click here

February 20, 2010 at 12:04 pm 3 comments


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