Posts tagged ‘brezza’

Reevaluating 2005 Barolos

Sergio Germano (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

“In my opinion, the 2005 Barolos are the best balanced of the last decade.” - Sergio Germano, winemaker, Ettore Germano estate, Serralunga d’Alba

Each year, I am invited to taste the new vintage of Barolo at a series of special press tastings in the city of Alba, only a few miles from the vineyards of these famous wines. Last May, I tasted over 100 examples of Barolo from the 2005 vintage and while I liked the wines overall, I was not that excited. I gave the vintage a rating of three stars – very good – and thought that while some of the wines were nicely concentrated, others lacked fruit. In other words, a mixed bag.

A few months later, I saw the promising notices in a few of Italy’s top wine guides such as Gambero Rosso and Duemilavini (the guide of the Association of Italian Sommeliers) regarding these wines. Each guide had given their highest rating to more than two dozen 2005 Barolos. My immediate reaction was that the staff of these guides had been too generous.

But after retasting some of the wines last Friday at the Tre Bicchieri tasting in Chicago, I have to admit that these publications were quite accurate. Any Barolo will improve after additional time in the bottle and now almost ten months after I first tasted the wines, they are rounding out nicely. The wines are now showing more expressive aromatics as well as more pronounced fruit on the palate and are indeed beauitfully balanced wines. 

I think what happened was that 2005 followed a great vintage in 2004. That vintage combined remarkable aromatics and fruit that were evident immediately upon release. Combine excellent concentration along with ideal acidity and you had a recipe for greatness. 

Wines like this don’t come along too often (otherwise the word “great” to describe a vintage would be relatively meaningless) and sure enough 2005 was  a year that gave us wines that were not as immediately impressive as those from 2004. Call these wines shy, if you will, but they did not show as well upon release as did the 2004s.

Now I am reevaluating my thoughts on the 2005 Barolos. Here are a few thoughts on a few of my favorites:

Brezza Sarmassa

Dried cherry and caraway aromas, medium-full with stylish tannins. A classy wine with pleasing herbal notes from this ultraconsistent, traditional producer. Best in 12-15 years.

Ettore Germano Prapo’

Gorgeous orange peel and marmalade aromas; elegantly syled tannins and beautiful acidity. Round, complex and complete, this is a silky, graceful wine. Best in 10-15 years. I also like the Germano Ceretta, which is a more powerful wine; however the Prapo’ gets my vote as the top Barolo from this producer.

Vajra Bricco delle Viole

This Barolo is from a small vineyard just above and outside the town of Barolo and means “hill of violets.” That is an apt descriptor for this fragrant wine which is as supple and as elegantly styled as you could want from a wine made from the Nebbiolo grape. Perfect acidity, bright fruit and ultra fine tannins. The finish goes on forever. Best in 12-15 years.

Vietti Lazzarito

Luca Currado at Vietti has been producing remarkable wines from this great Serralunga site for the past decade and has made this one of the winery’s best bottlings, an impressive feat considering that Currado also produces a Barolo from Brunate and Rocche. Deeply concentrated with firm, balanced tannins, this has the stuffing to age well for at least 12-15 years, perhaps longer.

Bruno Giacosa Le Rocche di Serralunga

No surprise here, as this is a huge wine with great fruit depth and typical Serralunga structure, meaning this will need many years in the bottle before its greatest complexities emerge. Big spice in the nose and on the palate with youthful, firm, but nicely integrated tannins, this will offer pleasure for at least two decades more.


March 3, 2010 at 10:21 am Leave a comment

Best Barolos

Renato Ratti Winery, Annunziata (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Renato Ratti Winery, Annunziata (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

A few months ago, I assembled the choices of several Italian wine authorities regarding Brunello di Montalcino. Today, we turn our attention to Barolo. (more…)

November 3, 2009 at 3:18 pm Leave a comment


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