Learning about Italian Wine and Food at Eataly

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Alex Pilas, Executive Chef, Eataly, New York City 

In mid-July, I was honored to co-teach an Italian wine and food class at Eataly in New York City with Dan Amatuzzi, wine educator for the store. The experience was great and I want to thank everyone at Eataly that assisted in this class.

That’s about all I want to write about myself, as this post is about learning about Italian wine and food the right way. At least that’s my opinion. What do I mean by the right way? I’m referring to enjoying a variety of Italian wines from numerous regions with traditional Italian foods.

Just look at the wines we tried in the class:  the special cuvée “Rabochon” (2005 vintage) from the Franciacorta producer Monte RossaVespa Bianco 2011 from Bastianich; Friulano 2007 “Vignecinquant’anni” from Le Vigne di ZamoMorellino di Scansano 2010 “Le Perazzi” from La MozzaDolcetto di Diano d’Alba “La Lepre” 2008  from Fonatanafredda and the Langhe Nebbiolo 2009 from Borgogno.

If you think this wasn’t the typical array of Italian wines you’re likely to taste at a class, you’re right. The wines were chosen for a few reasons, one being that they are all given a writeup in my recently published book Beyond Barolo and Brunello: Italy’s Most Distinctive Wines. In this book, I have endeavored to give the reader a portrait of the true Italian wine scene and not just coverage of the most famous wines from the country.

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So notice that there wasn’t a single example of Barolo, Brunello or Amarone, but rather wines that you might come across everyday in Italy. Combine that with some marvelous foods prepared by Eataly’s executive chef Alex Pilas  and you have a setting that in some ways brings Italy home. I told the students at the class that they were learning about Italian wine as the Italians do – in a relaxed setting, enjoying a glass of wine with local food.

Pesce crudo (raw fish) was served with the sparkling wine and the two whites; the acidity of these wines were an ideal match for the fish. Various styles of salumi (prosciutto di parma, soppressata) accompanied the Morellino di Scansano and the Dolcetto, while the final course was a mushroom ravioli that was paired with the Langhe Nebbiolo. I absolutely loved this match – and given the comments by the students, so did they – as the earthiness of the mushrooms were in tandem with the similar qualities of the Langhe Nebbiolo, which also happens to offer subtle notes of porcini in the aromas. You just don’t get a pairing that works as beautifully as that one did every day, so complimenti to chef Pilas!

Another note about the Borgogno Langhe Nebbiolo. I wanted to feature this offering, as this is the exact type of Italian wine that does not get the attention it deserves in the well-known consumer wine publications. Yet it is excellent and offers a sense of place – you can tell instantly that this is from Piemonte. What I love about this wine is that this is 100% Nebbiolo – the same as the much more expensive Barolo and has a lot in common with that more famous wine. Indeed, Borgogno produces this wine with Nebbiolo fruit sourced from five local vineyards that are also used by the produced for its various bottlings of Barolo. This is the type of Italian wine that everyone needs to know more about, not only because it displays lovely varietal purity and beautifully represents the land, but it is also a very reasonable alternative, pricewise, to Barolo. You’d be surprised how many of these wines exist in Italy, from Langhe Nebbiolo and Nebbiolo d’Alba in Piemonte to Aglianico in Campania in the south.

Generally, Italian wine classes are often about what I call “trophy” wines; the bottles that are the longest-lived and most renowned wines from the country. I love them, but more often, I seek out the best examples of everyday wines crafted by producers throughout Italy. That’s something I think every wine lover should do, as this will be an exercise in tradition and heritage and not merely a search for the highest scores. The best wines of Italy are meant for consumption with food; they play up to the food and when it’s done right, the total is far more than the sum of the parts.

So I was thrilled to have this experience co-teaching this class to consumers who were eager to learn about pairing Italian wines and foods the right way. Oscar Farinetti, who created Eataly in Torino about a decade ago, as well as Lidia and Joseph Bastianich and Mario Batali, co-proprietors of the New York Eataly, are creating an atmosphere of helping the consumer learn about the pleasures of Italian wine and food in a relaxing, no-nonsense way. Here’s to each of them for their work and here’s to their staff for involving me in this environment.

I can’t wait for Eataly to open up in Chicago later this year, where I hope to be part of more education about Italian wine and food!

August 4, 2013 at 4:06 pm Leave a comment

Lovely 2012 Whites from Collio

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Collio Vineyards of Livon looking towards Slovenia (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

During my recent visit to the Collio district of Friuli Venezia Giulia, I was able to taste several recently released white wines from the 2012 vintage. 2012 was a warm vintage, but unlike 2011, which was also quite hot, growers received a break with rain in late summer, which allowed longer ripening on the vine, giving the wines better acidity and structure. The 2011 Collio whites are very nice, but different, as they are very rich on the palate, while the 2012s are a bit more delicate, but have better balance overall and the potential to drink well for a few additional years.

Of course, Collio is a marvelous growing district, especially for white grapes, as there are temperate influences with both breezes from the nearby Adriatic Sea and well as winds from the Julian Alps, situated not too far away. Combine that with beautifully sited vineyards (Collio means “hill” in Italian) and you have a perfect home for distinctive white wines. The best examples here are what I like to call vibrant, as they excite your palate; how nice to find white wines that aren’t simple or on the other hand, burdensome. Be it monovarietal, such as Friulano, Sauvignon or Ribolla Gialla or several others or a wonderfully crafted blend of several varieties, the white wines from Collio are among the finest and most distinctive in the world.

Here are brief notes on some of my favorite 2012 Collio whites to date:

Villa Russiz Pinot Grigio – Yes, Pinot Grigio has become a commodity and unfortunately, there are too many insipid versions from Italy. But when it is made from grapes in a cool climate from hillside vineyards, the results are often wonderful. Villa Russiz has been producing one of Italy’s finest examples for some time now; this 2012 has a slight copper color (the color of the grape is actually a mix of copper, gray and gold) with fragrant aromas of Bosc pear, apple peel and magnolia. Medium-full, this is refreshing with very good acidity and a long finish. Simply put, it is delicious and beautifully made!

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Villa Russiz Malvasia – Malvasia (or Malvasia Istriana, as it is sometimes known in Friuli) is a beautiful variety with amazing aromatics and striking acidity. I love it and I hope that more producers will work with this variety and export it to the United States and other countries, so more consumers can experience the exotic pleasures of this wine. The 2012 Malvasia from Villa Russiz is excellent with gorgeous perfumes of papaya and hyacinth (how’s that for unique fragrances?), lovely acidity and impressive persistence. This is one of the best examples of Malvasia I’ve had, as this has a bit more depth of fruit than many versions that are “pretty,” yet lack concentration. Perfectly balanced, this has marvelous texture and could work with any number of foods, from Thai and Oriental cuisine to roast chicken with lemon and tarragon. Enjoy this now or over the next 2-3 years. Another beautiful examples of the strength and wide array of Collio whites!

Livon “Solarco” – This is a lovely blend of Ribolla Gialla and Friulano that Livon has perfected. Offering beautiful aromas of green apple, spearmint and lilacs, this is medium-bodied with very good acidity and balance. Refreshing and quite complex, this is a lovely wine at lunch with lighter seafood or pastas.

Livon “Soluna” – This is a Malvasia from Livon that displays excellent varietal character, especially with its lovely floral aromatics, with notes of quince and Anjou pear along with a distinctive notes of cinnamon. Medium-full, this has very good acidity and persistence and is simply delicious! Enjoy this over the next 2-3 years with Oriental cuisine.

Muzic Malvasia – Muzic is a small, but notable producer in Collio; this Malvasia is an excellent example of the quality at this estate. Aromas of yellow peaches, lemon rind and acacia flowers, this is a lovely wine with lively acidity and ideal ripeness.

Humar Friulano – Friulano, formerly known as Tocai Friulano, is a signature grape of Collio. This is a version that offers lovely aromas of Anjou pear and lilacs with impressive weight on the palate, very good acidity and impressive persistence. This can accompany many white meats as well as risotto or many vegetable dishes.

Russiz Superiore Pinot Grigio - There’s no great mystery to this wine; it’s just a well made PInot Grigio with rich concentration, ideal acidity and notes of white spice in the finish that give this wine added complexity. What a lovely wine for just sitting down and enjoying with good friends at an outdoor enoteca or garden, much as I did with Marco Felluga, proprietor of this estate, who is an energetic 86 years young. Here’s to many more great wines, Marco!

Livio Felluga Sauvignon – The Livio Felluga estate (Livio is the older brother of Marco; he is 99 years of age) produces wines from both Collio and the Colli Orientali del Friuli DOC zones. This 2012 Sauvignon is typical of the rich fruit and lively acidity one sees from this variety in Collio. Offering aromas of spearmint and white flowers along with just a hint of fresh hay, this is medium-full with lovely texture, good acidity and notable persistence. Beautifully balanced, this is a perfect partner with most shellfish; enjoy over the next 3-5 years.

July 5, 2013 at 11:31 am Leave a comment

Premio Collio

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The author pictured with the other four recipients of the 2013 Premio Collio

I’ve been a fortunate individual to have traveled to Italy so often and to have tasted so many great wines and more importantly, meet so many gracious, warm people. Each one of my 59 trips has been special, but perhaps none as memorable as the most recent to Collio, where I received the Premio Collio.

This award is given out each year by the Collio Consorzio to a few select journalists and wine professionals who have done the most to promote the wines of this beautiful district in the region of Friuli Venezia Giulia. Collio is situated in the southeastern portion of Friuli, in the province of Gorizia and shares part of its border with Slovenia. This area is blessed with rolling hills (the word collio means “hill” in Italian) and is a marvelous climate for grape growing, as there are breezes from the nearby Adriatic Sea as well as winds from the Julian Alps that help moderate temperatures, ensuring a slow, even ripening that results in wines with excellent natural acidity, pronounced aromatics and ideal structure. The cool climate here is ideal for vibrant white wines, although there are also some excellent red wines from Collio as well.

I was given the award for the section on the wines of Collio in my recently published book Beyond Barolo and Brunello: Italy’s Most Distinctive Wines. I wrote about selected wines from more than 20 producers in Collio; these included famed estates such as Marco Felluga, Schiopetto and Radikon. Individual wines included some very famous offerings such as the Edi Keber Collio (Bianco, though he chooses not to label it that way) and Villa Russiz Sauvignon “De la Tour” along with underrated bottlings such as the Gradis’ciutta “Bratinis” and the Primosic “Klin.”

I decided that I would give my acceptance speech in Italian, as I thought that was the proper thing to do. After more than fifty trips to Italy, I have a good foundation in Italian, though I am certainly not fluent in the language. I’m sure if I lived there for an extended period of time, that would be different, but for now, I can understand and speak Italian, relatively well.

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Giving my acceptance speech in Italian for the Premio Collio. Tania Princic, who helped me with the translation,  is to my right.

I speak often in seminars to the trade and public about Italian wines, but this night was very different, as I would be speaking to 125 locals in the wine business, so needless to say, I was a bit nervous. Prior speaking helped me overcome my nerves to a large degree, but it will still a unique experience that I hadn’t done before. Thankfully, Tania Princic, who works with the public relations group for Collio helped me to translate my speech into Italian just a short while before the event.

Now combine that with the fact that I had to wait more than an hour and a half and you can imagine that I was getting a little more nervous by the moment. But I made it through without too many mistakes (I did mess up a word or two) and the audience gave me a warm reception. I’m sure they appreciated my gesture of speaking in Italian and I’m glad I did as well, as it will help me prepare for the next time I need to give another speech in Italy.

I thought I’d close with the last paragraph of my speech, first in Italian and then translated into English.

“Non ho ancora visitato il Collio quanto mi sarebbe piaciuto, ma grazie alla ospitalita e la qualita dei vostri vini, vi guarantisco che ritorno molto presto.”

“I have not visited Collio as often as I would have liked, but thanks to your hospitality as well as the quality of your wines, I guarantee I will return very soon.”

Thank you very much to the producers of Collio for giving me this award. I am honored and I will certainly not only visit again soon, but will also continue to promote these wonderful wines any way I can! A special thank you also to Alessandra Gruppi and Veronica Brumat for their help organizing my trip.

June 24, 2013 at 9:13 am 2 comments

An Award for me- Savings for you

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I am being honored in Collio this weekend with the Premio Collio, an award that is given each year to the journalist who does the most to promote the region’s wines. This  year, I am receiving this honor for the section on Collio in my recently published book Beyond Barolo and Brunello: Italy’s Most Distinctive Wines.

I’m looking forward to this event and I’ll report back on it soon. In the meantime, in honor of this award, I am passing on special savings on the book for a limited time. From now until June 18, you can receive an 18% discount off the list price.

Here is what you need to do. Here is the link for ordering:

Use this discount code to apply the savings:

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Thanks and enjoy the book!

June 11, 2013 at 9:45 am Leave a comment

Chianti Classico – Restoring Some Luster

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I’ve addressed this situation in the past, but it bears repeating. Chianti Classico has lost a lot of luster and that’s a shame, as there are some outstanding examples. But the truth is that the consumer thinks of Chianti Classico as an ordinary wine, one that’s overpriced and too often, merely a red wine meant for quaffing or for the most basic food pairings.

I write this as I tasted a brilliant example of Chianti Classico the other day, the Felsina “Vigneto Rancia” Riserva 2008. In my recently published book Beyond Barolo and Brunello: Italy’s Most Distinctive Wines I wrote this about the wine:

“This estate has become one of the unmistakable reference points for Chianti Classico… It is with the single vineyard “Rancia” Chianti Classico that Felsina displays its best winemaking… this is a wine of outstanding complexity and breeding. When you find a young vintage, lay it away for a few years in the cellar, as peak consumption is generally at age 10-12.”

The 2008 release of this wine certainly fits this description, as there is excellent depth of fruit, notable persistence, lively acidity and outstanding structure. 2008 was an excellent year in Chianti Classico (and throughout most of Italy, for that matter), as this was a growing season that yielded wines that were classic (no pun attended) in nature, with excellent structure and a sense of place; brilliant producers such as Felsina made stunning wines from 2008. (Of course what makes Felsina so great is that even in years that aren’t considered classic, they still craft marvelous wines.)

Felsina of course, is not the only great producer in Chianti Classico. Fontodi is another as is Querciabella and there are another six to eight estates such as La Porta di VertineRocca di Montegrossi, Castello di Volpaia and Villa Calcinaia that routinely produce excellent wines. Producers such as these make wines that show the rest of the world what Chianti Classico can and should be. But there are not enough examples.

The problem is a big one and there are many reasons; yes, Sangiovese is a grape that has a high yield, so there are still too many producers that do not oversee the proper work in the vineyard, resulting in wines that are thin with modest fruit and high acidity. Certainly the producers of today do take more care in the vineyards than those of 30 or 40 years ago (generally speaking), but there are still too many examples of ordinary wines and the disciplinare allows vintners to make wines such as these.

But a bigger problem is that Chianti Classico is a rather large area, basically from Florence to Siena and given as vast a territory as this, not every vineyard is sited in the best spot. So while we hear all about the beauty of Tuscany and Chianti Classico, it doesn’t always translate into special wines.

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Vineyard in Panzano, one of the most prized sites of Chianti Classico (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

So how to fix this? Well there’s a logical solution, but it’s one that I truly think will never come about (I know that you’re never supposed to say never, but in this case, I believe I’m safe). The answer is zonation – allowing labels to list their zone of origin. This would mean that Felsina can list Castelnuovo Berandenga not just as the winery’s address in small print, but in larger print as a denomination of origin. The same would be true for Fontodi, as their estate vineyards are situated in Panzano, also known as the Conca d’Oro (“the golden hill”); other fine estates located here, such as Panzanello and Il Molino di Grace could also label their wines as being from Panzano grapes. As Panzano is recognized by everyone who is familiar with Chianti Classico as one of its very best sub-zones, listing this geographical name on a label would certainly add a dimension of prestige to the wine, which would help sales of those specific wines and perhaps Chianti Classico in general.

There are several sub-zones in Chianti Classico, from Greve to Castellina in Chianti to Radda and Gaiole; the wines vary in terms of aromatics, weight and acidity, as you might imagine; after all these areas are micro-climates. When speaking about Barolo in Piemonte, dozens of crus (single vineyards) have been officially recognized and we talk about the differences in wines from La Morra with their floral perfumes and gentle tannins as opposed to the more muscular style of Barolo from Monforte d’Alba or Serralunga d’Alba.

So why not in Chianti Classico? Well maybe it’s a Tuscan mentality; the same problem exists with Brunello di Montalcino, as has been documented by Kerin O’Keefe in her excellent book about this wine. Maybe it’s a larger problem, especially when you consider the old joke about getting more than five Italians to agree on anything. But kidding aside, it’s politics, plain and simple, as least as it seems to me. Tuscany, unlike Piemonte, is represented by both farmers and wealthy businessmen, many of whom made their fortunes in other businesses, often in foreign countries. There’s nothing wrong with these people owning estates in Chianti Classico and other wine districts of Tuscany, especially as new blood can infuse a tired corpse, but in reality, do these people have the same sense of pride about their land as farmers in Piemonte whose families have been working their land for more than 100 years in many cases?

Then you have the problem of Chianti Classico being a victim of its own success. This is such a recognizable name around the world – indeed it may be the world’s most beloved and recognizable red wine – so that producers do all they can to attract as many new drinkers as possible around the globe. This means producing an international wine – really, was it a smart decision to allow producers to include Cabernet Sauvignon in Chianti Classico? – one that too often loses its expression of local terroir. If it’s a success in Italy and the United States and Scandanvia, why change? Let’s try and make it appealing to everyone, from Russia and China to Japan and Hong Kong. Try and please everyone and you wind up pleasing no one.

This problem does not exist only in Chianti Classico; there are international wines made in other part of Italy as well. But few wines are as well known as Chianti Classico and few have lost as much market share (at least in the United States, a very important market, without question) as this wine. Price has something to do with this and it’s not the fault of the local producers that the US dollar isn’t as strong against the Euro as it used to be (although admittedly, it’s better today than four or five years ago). But for a wine that was routinely $14 on retail shelves about five or six years ago, it’s now $18-$20 and that’s for the basic Chianti Classico, not riserva. For $14, tens and hundreds of thousands of American wine drinkers are purchasing Malbec from Argentina. What does this have to do with Italy? Nothing of course, but these consumers are looking for a wine they like at a price that they’re comfortable with. If Chianti Classico can’t come in at that price, so be it, Malbec can.

Back to Felsina and Fontodi and a few dozen Chianti Classico estates that really deliver the goods. As I wrote above, these producers show the world that Chianti Classico can be a very special wine. It’s just that too many producers in Chianti Classico take the easy way out, cashing in on the success of the Chianti Classico marque. The bottom line is average quality, which drags down the overall image of this wine. As it stands now, Felsina and Fontodi will sell every bottle of wine they make, as they continue to push themselves to make the best wines possible and enough people realize that. It’s a shame that too many Chianti Classico producers don’t make similar efforts. Resting on your laurels – if one can call it that – is never a good thing and Chianti Classico sales – and the image of this wine  – are taking a beating.

June 8, 2013 at 6:19 pm 10 comments

Orange Wines from Oslavia – Outstanding!

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La Castellada Ribolla Gialla 2007 – an outstanding orange wine (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Studying the wonderful world of Italian wines is an exercise in discovering something very new and distinct at every step of the journey. If you’re someone who prefers a few select wines, you probably don’t understand the charm and the allure of Italian wines. But if you want to move beyond the ordinary, Italian wines are for you.

That said, the orange wines from the Friuli region in far northeastern Italy are truly unique wines, even for Italy. Few people have tried them and fewer still understand them. So what an honor it was for me to moderate a special seminar on the orange wines made from the Ribolla Gialla grape in the small Oslavia zone of the Collio wine district.

This event was held in Chicago and was the creation of six producers from Oslavia that have united to produce and promote the orange wines made from the Ribolla Gialla grape. The vintners that were in Chicago – and then Los Angeles a few days later for a similar event – were primarily the younger generation who are working with their parents in the vineyards and cellars in their small community. The list: Marko Primosic (Primosic); Stefano Bensa (La Castellada); Marco Princic (Dario Princic); Saša Radikon (Radikon); Martin Figelj (Fiegl) and Naike Sosol (Il Carpino).

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Marko Primosic (Photo © Eric Benjamin Kleinberg)

A few notes about Ribolla Gialla in Collio and Oslavia. This is an indigenous variety and it is especially tied in with Oslavia, as these grapes have always been prized in this zone; indeed, when this land was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire, merchants would sell the best bunches to the wealthy class, while leaving the other grapes on the vines. Vintners here recall eating these grapes when they were young and in some instances, two liters of Ribolla Gialla per day would serve as partial payment for the laborers in the fields.

While Ribolla Gialla can be made as a typical white, fermented and aged in stainless steel tanks and then released some six months after the harvest, these producers believe that because of the thick skin of this grape, they can craft a more complex wine by macerating on the skins for an extended period, ranging from 30 to 45 to even 90 or 120 days, as in the case of Radikon. This gives these wines tannins, which allows the producers to limit the amount of sulfur added to the wine; for Radikon, they have been making this wine without the addition of any sulfur since 2002 (much of the orange hue, incidentally, is natural, as the grapes change to this color with late summer and early autumn sunshine – this is a variety that is routinely harvested in the first or second week of October).

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Radikon Ribolla (Photo ©Eric Benjamin Kleinberg)

I asked several of Chicago’s top sommeliers, who were in attendance, their thoughts about the wines. All were quite praiseworthy of the wines, noting their extremely high level of quality; Charles Schneider of Binny’s Chop House, mentioned that in his notes on these wines, he was writing much more descriptors than he does for most red wines – that’s some praise, indeed! I agreed with him, finding notes not only of mandarin orange and tangerine, but also honey, marzipan and almond. The wines ranged in vintages from 2011 back to 2007 (Radikon and La Castellada) and the colors ranged from light orange for the youngest wine to deep orange/amber gold for the oldest wines.

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Chef Mauro Mafrici telling the producers and guests about his food pairings with the Ribolla Gialla wines (Photo ©Eric Benjamin Kleinberg)

Viktorija Todorovska, a Chicago-based writer and chef, who specializes in Italian food and wine, mentioned that as the wines are so unique, yet so unknown, they really need to be paired with food, in order to get the message across. Boy, were we treated to some marvelous food from Chef Mauro Mafrici of Pelago Ristorante as well as Masaki Restaurant, who prepared both sushi/sashimi with the wines as well as traditional Italian dishes from pasta to roast veal. The acidity in these wines is not searing, so they can accompany a wide range of foods and Mafrici- who is clearly one of the city’s finest and most inventive chefs – performed brilliantly.

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Foods paired with the Ribolla Gialla ranged from sushi… (Photo ©Eric Benjamin Kleinberg)

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… to roast veal (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

This was truly one of the most fascinating wine seminars I have ever been involved in and it was indeed an honor to moderate the discussion. It seems clear that the mainstream wine publications in America are not going to devote much space to these wines; the reasons most likely range from their limited production to the fact that they may indeed not “get” these wines. Make no mistake, these wines are individualistic and not for the general public. But how fortunate are we that these six producers – almost every vintner in Oslavia – go to the trouble to make these wines not only to show the world what orange wines are all about, but also to make a statement that here is the wine – Ribolla Gialla with an orange hue, aged often for several years in large casks, wines that can age for more than a decade – here are wines that represent Oslavia to the world. Just as Montalcino is a cradle for Sangiovese and the Barolo zone is home to the world’s greatest examples of Nebbiolo, so too, this little district in southern Collio, very close to the border with Slovenia, is home to one of the world’s most remarkable wines.

That’s something to celebrate!

 

A special thank you to Alessandra Gruppi from Collio for asking me to organize and speak at this event. Also a special thank you to Marko Primosic for his cooperation in putting this event together and my gratitude as well to Eric Benjamin Kleinberg for letting me use his first-rate images in this post.

And finally, a big thank you to Chef Mauro Mafrici for his efforts as well as the six producers for coming to Chicago and for making these brilliant wines that truly reflect a sense of place!

June 3, 2013 at 4:52 pm Leave a comment

Some Favorite Wines from Piemonte not named Barolo or Barbaresco

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Lucrezia Carrega, Malabaila di Canale (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

I’ve just returned from eleven busy days in Piemonte and as usual, enjoyed a great time. The food was especially awesome this time, being able to dine at so many special places (Felicin in Monforte, Tota Virginia in Serralunga and Trattoria La Libera in Alba – this last one twice). Of course, there were a good number of excellent wines as well – is there a better red wine region in Italy than Piemonte?

Barolo and Barbaresco were the primary reasons I was there and I’ll report on the new vintages – 2009 for the former and 2010 for the latter – soon. But for this post, I’d like to note some other Piemontese wines I enjoyed this visit that were excellent.

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I’ll bet you don’t think about sparkling wines when you consider Piemonte, but there are some excellent examples and I’m not referring to Asti Spumante. No, I’m talking about a category of sparkling wines known as Alta Langa. As the name suggests, the vineyard used for these wines are located at a higher elevation than most in the region, making them ideal for sparking wines, which require higher acidity for proper structure and balance.

What’s nice about Alta Langa is the purity of flavors in these wines. I’m not about to write that these are better sparkling wines than those coming from Franciacorta – both are metodo classico, by the way – as the Franciacorta wines tend to offer greater complexity as well as richness in the mouth. But what the Alta Langa wines lack in power, they more than make up for in finesse and varietal character. The best examples – I’ve tasted some lovely bottles from both Fontanafredda and Ettore Germano – are clean, ideally balanced and charming. Not a bad combination!

But now on this trip, I enjoyed the crowning achievement in Alta Langa to date – not only for my tastes, but also for many other Italian wine authorities. That wine is the Enrico Serafino Alta Langa “Zero” – in this case, the 2005 vintage. This is a wine that spent six years on the yeasts before disgorgement and that extra aging time has given this wine some added dimensions you don’t find in most examples of Alta Langa. There is a light touch of yeastiness in the aromas, although this is not a toasty, biscuity style in the mode of many similarly aged Champagnes. Rather, there are lovely pear and fig flavors, a rich mid-palate and an ultra-long, round, clean finish with excellent acidity. This wine really cleans your mouth and is especially marvelous paired with seafood.

By the way, I mentioned that other Italian wine authorities have also raved about this wine. Primary evidence of that is Gambero Rosso, the Italian wine bible, having awarded this 2005 its highest rating of tre bicchieri; they did the same for the 2006 bottling, which I have yet to try, but certainly will. Here’s hoping that Palm Bay, the US importer for Serafino, will start to bring in at least a small amount of this wine soon so that American consumers won’t have to travel to Piemonte to taste this enchanting sparkler.

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As for white wines, there are a surprising number of excellent types made in Piemonte, such as Gavi, Timorasso and Favorita and of course, Arneis. This last wine, the most famous of which are from the Roero district, situated across from the Langhe on the opposite side of the Tanaro River, has become a great success not only in Italy and throughout much of Europe, but also in the United States, both by the bottle and the glass. Most examples are tank fermented and aged to highlight the lovely fruit aromas and flavors, but there are few examples that are aged for a short time in wood.

I enjoyed two excellent Arneis from the beautiful, but underrated Roero estate, Malabaila di Canale. situated in that charming town. Both were from the 2012 vintage, a warm year that yielded forward, but more complex wines than in 2011. The entry level bottling has those beautiful pear and melon flavors so typical of the variety and is very refreshing, with impressive richness. The “Pradvaj” offering, from a lovely sloping hillside planting at the winery, is an outstanding Arneis, with a touch of honey in the aromas to accompany the classic varietal flavors; the mid-palate is quite generous and the finish is very long. This is a first-rate white wine that I’d prefer to pair with white meats (even veal) as well as most seafood. These wines are imported in the US, as they are Marc de Grazia selections and there are various distributors, such as Skurnik in the New York/New Jersey area as well as Robert Houde in Chicago. (The retail price on the Pradvaj is betwen $20 and $22 in the US; to me, the wine is worth every penny.)

Cappellano-BACK-label-BARBERA-DALBA-GABUTTI

Finally, a few lovely reds. First there was the Cappellano Barbera d’Alba “Gabutti” 2008. My companion and I had been through the ringer tasting so many examples of Barolo and Barbaresco, so for dinner we wanted a red with very modest tannins. Barbera was the perfect choice and with this offering from Cappellano, we found the ideal Barbera. Teobaldo Cappellano, who passed away a few years ago, was a strict traditionalist with all his wines and made some celebrated examples of Barolo over the past few decades. What you had to admire about him – and this is stated in Italian on the back label – is that he did not want his wines to be rated with numerical scores, preferring that any particular journalist or critic merely write about the wine itself, its special flavors and its pleasure. What a great man and what a wonderful philosophy. Wouldn’t it be nice if this attitude were more in the norm of what wine would be about today?

Anyway, this Barbera, proved that Cappellano cared a lot about all his wines, not just the famous ones (Note: Teobaldo’s son Augusto now makes the wines and has continued his father’s memorable work). This wine, from the Gabutti cru in Serralunga, was steel aged with fresh blackberry and myrtle flavors, backed by good richness on the palate and a juicy, flavorful, very elegant finish with a clean, round note. What an ideal wine for just about any food, from simple pasta to sautéed duck breast or lumache (snails). This is imported in the US by Rosenthal Wine Merchants.

SAN-LUIGI-2011-243x1024

Finally, a few words about a marvelous Dolcetto, the Chionetti Dogliani “San Luigi” 2011. I love Dolcetto and as I hadn’t tasted a single example during my trip as of the final evening in Alba, I was eager to taste one. This one was everything I expected. Chionetti, established in 1912, has been one of the standard bearers for Dolcetto in the lovely town of Dogliani, a little bit south of the town of Barolo. The producers here pride themselves on the power and complexity of their offerings of Dolcetto, believing that other versions, such as those labeled as Dolcetto d’Alba or Diano d’Alba, are relatively minor league by comparison (this is their opinion, not necessarily mine).

Given that, some offerings of Dolcetto from Dogliani (the DOCG versions are now identified simply as Dogliani – the grape name is omitted from the label), can be a bit overdone, sometimes in ripeness, other times in terms of cellar work to attempt to produce a more powerful wine. Thankfully, that was not a problem with this single vineyard offering from Chionetti (San Luigi is one of the producer’s best and most consistent offerings). This newly released 2011 – appropriate as this wine has only modest tannins – is a sheer delight with black plum and raspberry flavors, very good acidity and an elegant, supple finish. This is a textbook example of Dogliani and if more examples were made in this fashion, perhaps Dolcetto from Dogliani – as well as other examples of the variety – would enjoy greater sales success.

It was a perfect accompaniment to the dish of seppie nere (“black” octopus, if you will) I enjoyed at Trattoria La Libera. I’d also love to pair it with rabbit, lighter game birds and delicate pastas. The wine in imported in the US by Vinifera Imports.

So there you have it, a selection of wonderful Piemontese wines, all meant for the dinner table and not a single one named Barolo or Barbaresco. Sometimes, the greatest pleasures are indeed the simplest!

May 21, 2013 at 1:46 pm 1 comment

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tom hyland

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