Amarone

September 22, 2009 at 11:23 am 5 comments

Grapes being dried for production of Amarone (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Grapes being dried for production of Amarone (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Few wines produced anywhere in the world have captured wine consumers’ imaginations as has Amarone. Rich and powerful, this is a red wine that is appealing upon release, but offers an entirely different sensation when consumed a decade or more after the vintage.

Amarone is produced in the Valpolicella zone, just north and west of the city of Verona in the Veneto region. In fact, Amarone is a Valpolicella – the full name is Amarone della Valpoicella (if it is produced from grapes grown in the Classico zone, then the word Classico is attached as a suffix).

As it is a Valpolicella, it is made from the same varieties as that wine. There are three major ones: Corvina, Rondinella and Molinara. Most examples of a Valpolicella or Amarone are primarily Corvina and Rondinella, as Molinara has become less and less important in most bottlings. There are other varieties as well, such as Corvinone (a clone of Corvina), Oseleta and Rossignola; regulations also allow for small percentages of Sangiovese to be included in the blend, though this is rare.

What makes an Amarone different from a Valpolicella? Basically it is the production method. Grapes destined for an Amarone are harvested earlier than those for a regular Valpolicella (usually 7-10 days early) and are then put in plastic boxes or on straw or bamboo mats in special temperature controlled rooms to dry. This drying period lasts 3-4 months and during this time, the grapes lose as much as 40% of their natural water content. This causes the grapes to shrivel in size and by the end of the drying period, they look more like raisins than grapes. This process of making Amarone by naturally drying the grapes is known as appassimento.

After that, the grapes are then fermented and then aged in barrels. Here, a winemaker has a choice. Traditionally, producers used only large wooden casks known as botti grandi to age their wines. But over the past two decades, many producers of Amarone, as is the case with several other famous Italian red wines, have opted to age their wines in small oak barrels, usually French barriques.

The difference is striking, as the wines aged in large casks offer more red cherry, dried herb and cedar notes, while the barrique-aged versions tend to display more black fruits along with the vanilla and toasty notes of the small oak barrels. The debate rages on whether the wines aged in small barrels can age as long as the traditionally made wines, but it will take many more years to answer that question. To sample the difference between a Amarone aged in large casks versus one aged in small barrels, try a bottling from Bertani (traditional) and Allegrini (modern); both producers are highly respected.

One of the natural by-products of the appassimento process is that Amarone will have a slightly higher percentage of alcohol; this occurs during the months of drying. Thus look for most Amarones to have 14.5% or 15% alcohol. Naturally, a wine like this needs very rich food, so pair Amarone with game birds, stews or roasts.

While it’s fine to serve these wines young (the 2006 bottlings of Amarone are on the market currently in 2009), you will enjoy your Amarone much more if you age the wine for a few years. This may be difficult for many consumers as a newly released bottlings offers ripe cherry fruit and a light raisiny quality along with an illusion of “sweetness.” This is a dry wine, so the sweet edge comes from the glycerine of the sugars in the dried grapes. This sensation is what gives Amarone such an unusual flavor and makes this such a popular wine.

If you can get by that young flavor sensation, you will find a wine offering greater complexities at 5-7 years of age (or older). The young fruit and sweetness are diminshed and what comes across are dried herbs and fruit with round, elegant tannins. The wine loses its brashness and becomes more finesseful. So at 7-10 years of age, instead of pairing an Amarone with robust foods, try matching it with duck breast or grilled chicken. There are other possibilities of course, but it is striking how different an older Amarone tastes than a newly released version.

Here is a short list of some of the finest producers of Amarone:

  • Igino Accordini
  • Stefano Accordini
  • Allegrini
  • Bertani
  • Bolla
  • Ca’ La Bionda
  • Campagnola
  • Cesari
  • Corte Sant’Alda
  • Dal Forno
  • Masi
  • Quintarelli
  • Santa Sofia
  • Santi
  • Sartori
  • Speri
  • Tedeschi
  • Tenuta Sant’Antonio
  • Tenute Galtarossa
  • Tommassi
  • Villa Monteleone
  • Zenato
  • Zeni

 

<strong>Armando Castagnedi of Tenuta Sant'Antonio</strong> (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

Armando Castagnedi of Tenuta Sant'Antonio (Photo ©Tom Hyland)

There is also a sweet wine made in the appassimento process produced from the same grapes that is fermented so that some residual sugar remains. This is a recioto (full name Recioto della Valpolicella) and is made by most Amarone producers. This is the traditional wine made for more than 2000 years; in fact it was not until the 1950s that Amarone as we know it today was first produced. Today the dry wines (Amarone) are the norm, while the historically famous sweet recioto is not seen as much currently. This is a shame, as the recioto is absolutely delicious with raspberry  and black plum fruit and moderate sweetness. It can be enjoyed on its own or is ideal with a blue cheese (Gorgonzola) or with a raspberry or chocolate dessert (yes, Recioto della Valpolicella is a wonderful wine with chocolate!).

 
One final note on Amarone. As it is a time consuming and costly process to make the wine, Amarone will be expensive. Look for most bottlings on retail shelves in America to cost between $50 and $80, with a few nearing $100.

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Finding Values “B”eautiful Italian Reds

5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. AJ  |  October 3, 2009 at 2:00 pm

    Tom, Great post! These rich and powerful wines with their plethora of new world and hard knock traditionalist producers can be a minefield for the uninitiated to negotiate. Have you done a post on Amarone’s baby brother Valpolicella Ripassos yet? Wonderful wines to enjoy while waiting for your Amarone to mature. Thanks for sharing the knowlege.

    Reply
  • 2. tom hyland  |  October 3, 2009 at 5:17 pm

    Thanks for the nice comment.

    I will write soon about Ripasso.

    Reply
  • 3. Buy Wine Online  |  October 4, 2009 at 12:54 pm

    Thanks, This is a great post. Amarones are some of my favorite wines. Unfortunately many people aren’t familiar with them. This will help open their eyes to a more approachable wine.

    Thanks,
    Matt

    Reply
  • 4. Lizzy  |  October 9, 2009 at 9:58 am

    Hi Tom,
    great post indeed! However, today – unfortunately, IMHO – Molinara is not in the current blend for Amarone or Recioto della Valpolicella, because producers prefer Corvinone. So, the traditional blend of Corvina, Rondinella, Molinara, in an Amarone wine is very rare: you can find it in very few, traditional producers, as “Il Velluto” winery (Sant’Ambrogio di Valpolicella).
    The reason of this lies in the fact that the Molinara is a grape low in color, while the consumer’s trends prefer wine rich in very deep colour…
    Cheers from Valpolicella!
    Lizzy

    Reply
  • 5. tom hyland  |  October 9, 2009 at 10:17 am

    Lizzy:

    Thanks for your comment. If you read the post closely, you’ll see that I did indeed mention that “Molinara has become less and less important in most bottlings.” I then went ahead and mentioned other varieties that are used, including Corvinone.

    Reply

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